Creating end-to-end IoT applications with Eclipse Kura & Solair IoT Platform

| March 1, 2016

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Starting from the winner project of the first Eclipse Open IoT Challenge, Carracho, the purpose of this webinar is showing how a good idea can become a success project with limited efforts in writing code.
Carracho is a cloud vehicle monitoring application that reads vehicle ECU (Engine Control Unit) parameters, capture GPS data, provides anti-theft feature and detects security issues like flames or gas leaks.

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OTHER ARTICLES

Microsoft acquires ReFirm Labs to enhance IoT security

Article | June 2, 2021

Modern computing devices can be thought of as a collection of discrete microprocessors each with a dedicated function like high-speed networking, graphics, Disk I/O, AI, and everything in between. The emergence of the intelligent edge has accelerated the number of these cloud-connected devices that contain multiple specialized sub-processors each with its own firmware layer and often a custom operating system. Many vulnerability analysis and endpoint detection and response (EDR) tools find it challenging to monitor and protect devices at the firmware level, leading to an attractive security gap for attackers to exploit. At the same time, we have also seen growth in the number of attacks against firmware where sensitive information like credentials and encryption keys are stored in memory. A recent survey commissioned by Microsoft of 1,000 security decision-makers found that 83 percent had experienced some level of firmware security incident, but only 29 percent are allocating resources to protect that critical layer. And according to March 2021 data from the National Vulnerability Database included in a presentation from the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Agency (CISA) at the 2021 RSA, difficult-to-patch firmware attacks are continuing to rise. Microsoft’s Azure Defender for IoT team (formerly CyberX) recently announced alongside the Department of Homeland Security a series of more than 25 critical severity vulnerabilities in IoT and OT devices

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What is Google Pigweed? Google’s unveils new toys for IoT developers

Article | June 2, 2021

One might be forgiven for thinking that Google had enough operating systems. Other than Android, Google also owns Chrome OS and Google Fuchsia – the latter of which isn’t even finished yet! But then came murmurs of a project called Pigweed, following a Google trademark that surfaced in February this year. At first, speculation was rife that this was yet another operating system, due to wording that described it as “computer operating software.” Now we know that is not the case. So what is Google Pigweed? In a recent blog post, Google officially threw back the curtain. Google Pigweed, it turns out, is a collection of embedded platform developer tools for development on 32-bit microcontrollers. Effectively, these are libraries targeted at Internet of Things (IoT) applications.

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More Than Half of IoT Devices Vulnerable to Severe Attacks

Article | June 2, 2021

More than half of all internet of things (IoT) devices are vulnerable to medium- or high-severity attacks, meaning that enterprises are sitting on a “ticking IoT time bomb,” according to Palo Alto Networks Unit 42 research team. In new research released Tuesday, researchers said that several deep-rooted issues exist around connected devices, both used by general enterprises and in medical environments. At the most basic level researchers found that 98 percent of all IoT device traffic is unencrypted, exposing personal and confidential data on the network. Other issues, like the reliance on outdated legacy protocols and operating systems, are opening up organizations up to older attack techniques that IT teams may not have had to deal with in years. For instance, researchers outlined one attack they discovered of a connected mammogram machine, used in a hospital, by the Conficker worm (malware first discovered more than a decade ago).

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Frailties of LoRaWAN IoT Devices

Article | June 2, 2021

Low-power wide-area networks (LPWANs) are helping drive the Internet of things (IoT) explosion. They connect millions of low-power IoT and Industrial IoT (IIoT) devices into wireless networks over a range of distances, from short to really, really long, from indoor applications to those covering large fields or even cities. But device designers using the LoRaWAN standard may be lulled into thinking that just configuring its security keys is enough to prevent their devices from being hacked. A new report says it isn’t. Four protocols give enterprises a choice in LPWAN connectivity: cellular NB-IoT, LTE-M, and Sigfox, and the non-cellular LoRaWAN standard. Among these, the open LoRaWAN overwhelmingly dominates. Omdia (formerly IHS Markit – Technology) projects a “quite high forecast” for LoRa, said Lee Ratliff, senior principal analyst, connectivity and IoT.

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