How IoT Is Transforming The Future of Healthcare

N/A | June 3, 2019

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According to a report released by National Institutes of Health in 2016, the world’s older population is growing dramatically. 8.5% of people worldwide (617 million) are aged 65 and over and this is projected to jump to nearly 17% of the world’s population by 2050 (1.6 billion). To add on, global life expectancy at birth is projected to increase by almost eight years, climbing from 68.6 years in 2015 to 76.2 years in 20501. Together with the rise of chronic illness, this will, if it hasn’t already, increase the demand in healthcare and push the current systems beyond its limit and capabilities. Hospital staffs will be asked to do much more than what they can handle. To make matters worse, societies have rising expectations for more and better health services. Hospitals and healthcare facilities will face difficult times balancing expectations against available resources.

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OTHER ARTICLES

More Than Half of IoT Devices Vulnerable to Severe Attacks

Article | March 11, 2020

More than half of all internet of things (IoT) devices are vulnerable to medium- or high-severity attacks, meaning that enterprises are sitting on a “ticking IoT time bomb,” according to Palo Alto Networks Unit 42 research team. In new research released Tuesday, researchers said that several deep-rooted issues exist around connected devices, both used by general enterprises and in medical environments. At the most basic level researchers found that 98 percent of all IoT device traffic is unencrypted, exposing personal and confidential data on the network. Other issues, like the reliance on outdated legacy protocols and operating systems, are opening up organizations up to older attack techniques that IT teams may not have had to deal with in years. For instance, researchers outlined one attack they discovered of a connected mammogram machine, used in a hospital, by the Conficker worm (malware first discovered more than a decade ago).

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Scalable Software with Devops for Industrial IoT

Article | April 6, 2020

Scaling Industrial IoT (IIoT) solutions requires a DevOps organization that can manage increased software and hardware complexity in terms of capability, capacity and footprint. DevOps is derived from Development and Operations and is one of the buzz words for ICT companies. Often it is the amalgamation of Software Developers from R&D and senior engineers from Operations into a new organization. Startups are faced with the challenge of how to quickly create a functioning DevOps organization that can scale with rapid growth. In this article, we will deal with the keys for success to scale software solutions with using an example of an Industrial IoT solution. We will look at how DevOps should function and discuss the important principles for software development, tools and operations.

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Future ‘smart walls’ key to IoT

Article | February 10, 2020

IoT equipment designers shooting for efficiency should explore the potential for using buildings as antennas, researchers say. Environmental surfaces such as walls can be used to intercept and beam signals, which can increase reliability and data throughput for devices, according to MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL).Researchers at CSAIL have been working on a smart-surface repeating antenna array called RFocus. The antennas, which could be applied in sheets like wallpaper, are designed to be incorporated into office spaces and factories. Radios that broadcast signals could then become smaller and less power intensive.

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THE FUTURE OF BIOMETRICS IOT

Article | April 3, 2020

In 2018 when Apple unveiled its iconic iPhone X with a feature to unlock the phone with Face ID thereby eliminating the use of the home button, it met a lot of eye-rolls. Fast forward to now, people are in love with the biometrics enabled technologies. While iPhone X had a unimodal authentication system, gadget these days have updated themselves in a better way. Let’s try to have a better understanding of the Biometrics. Biometrics are a way to measure a person’s physical characteristics to verify their identity. It can be physiological traits, like fingerprints and eyes, or behavioral traits, that define the manner an individual respond to stimuli. These characteristics are unique to the person. Once collected the data compared with the pre-existing database to find a match. Accordingly, it then produces an outcome. There are many varieties in which this data is collected. Facial and voice recognition, iris and finger scanner, signature verification, hand geometry, keystroke, gait detectors are some of the examples.

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Spotlight

DragonWave-X

Founded in 2000, DragonWave® is the market and technology leader for high-capacity packet microwave solutions. With deployments in more than 150 countries, we enable service providers, government agencies, enterprises, healthcare facilities, educational institutions and other organizations to meet their increasing bandwidth requirements rapidly and affordably.

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