How much Data Will The Internet of Things (IoT) Generate by 2020?

| October 12, 2016

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The Internet of Things (IoT) has exploded over these past three years, and according to Gartner research, 25 billion connected “things” will be connected to the Internet by 2020. With the influx of smart technology, IPV6 will provide enough IP addresses to more than sufficiently cover the evolving digital life of consumers.

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iOTOS

iOTOS develops and licenses Internet of Things technology allowing consumer product and electronics manufacturers to give consumers control of their products and appliances using a smartphone.

OTHER ARTICLES

Top ‘avenues’ for developers in smart cities

Article | April 1, 2020

Perhaps no more than a decade ago, the notion of ‘smart cities’ probably implied thoughts of which metropolitan areas could be said to have the greatest density of schools, colleges and universities. You want a smart city? Okay, how about Oxford, Cambridge, Massachusetts, Washington DC, Paris and so on. But that’s (obviously) not what we mean by smart cities today. In this post-millennial age, we define a smart city is a municipality that uses information and communication technologies (many of which will gravitate towards the Internet of Things (IoT) and the data backbones that serve it with application processing, data analytics and increasing amounts of AI) to increase operational efficiency, share information with the public and improve both the quality of government services and citizen welfare.

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Internet of Things (IoT): The Need for Vendors to Address Security

Article | April 1, 2020

By the end of this year there will be 5.8 billion Internet of Things (IoT) endpoints, according to Gartner. And depending on how IoT devices are counted the number is even higher. Statista, for example, estimates the device count for 2020 to be more than 30 billion. Security remains a big challenge for IoT as a strategy to be successful. IoT devices are still not being designed with security as a top priority.Mary O’Neill, VP of security at Nokia, noted in a press conference at MWC Los Angeles 2019 and reported by SDXCentral, that “if an IoT device today is plugged into the network and it doesn’t have protection on it, it’s infected in three minutes or less.”Jake Williams, founder of the security firm Rendition Infosec, said that “IoT vendors emphasize, often rightly, that their products improve quality of life, but they often neglect to disclose the risk of these devices to consumers. The onus of understanding how an IoT device might impact security should not be purely on the consumer. The vendor shares this responsibility.

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IoT Adoption: Before and After COVID-19

Article | April 1, 2020

The survey data I’m referring to comes from a study conducted by the Eclipse Foundation about the adoption of commercial Internet of Things (IoT) technology. The aim of the study was to get a better understanding of the IoT industry landscape by identifying the requirements, priorities, and challenges faced by organizations deploying and using commercial IoT technologies. More than 350 respondents from multiple industries responded, with about a quarter of respondents coming from industrial production businesses. While this survey was not solely focused on the manufacturing and processing industries, its results reflect the general business community’s IoT adoption at the end of 2019. As such, it is a pre-COVID-19 snapshot of IoT adoption.

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Securing industrial networks: it’s a journey

Article | April 1, 2020

Trying to secure the industrial network in one go is like boiling the ocean. Better to view it as a journey. At each step in the journey, you’ll make incremental changes to people, process, and technology. Minimal security. This is the current state for most manufacturers. If you’re here, you’ve segmented the industrial network from the IT network. Traffic can’t cross from the IT network to the industrial network without clearing the DMZ. You can block malware from entering the industrial network. You can block malware from leaving the industrial network to infect the enterprise network. But if the industrial network is exposed to malicious software, you don’t have a way to contain it. That means the malware might affect multiple manufacturing cells or production lines — even multiple plants.

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iOTOS

iOTOS develops and licenses Internet of Things technology allowing consumer product and electronics manufacturers to give consumers control of their products and appliances using a smartphone.

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