Industrial Internet Of Things Infographics

| January 23, 2019

article image
“It is estimated that by 2030 Industrial IoT could contribute $14.2 trillion to the global economy.” Initially, the IIoT or Industrial Internet of Things referred to an Industrial framework whereby a large number of machines or devices are interconnected and synchronized through the use of software tools and third platform technologies in an M2M (machine-to-machine) and the Internet of Things context. Nowadays, the Industrial Internet of Things (Industrial IoT) is considered an evolution of Industry 3.0, hence called Industry 4.0. Today the Industrial IoT is primarily used in the scope of IoT application outside of the consumer space and is all about use cases and applications across several industry verticals.

Spotlight

Vivio

Here at Vivio we understand the importance of keeping you connected. This means providing your people with the information and tools they need in order to do their jobs well, wherever they are.

OTHER ARTICLES

Frailties of LoRaWAN IoT Devices

Article | March 5, 2020

Low-power wide-area networks (LPWANs) are helping drive the Internet of things (IoT) explosion. They connect millions of low-power IoT and Industrial IoT (IIoT) devices into wireless networks over a range of distances, from short to really, really long, from indoor applications to those covering large fields or even cities. But device designers using the LoRaWAN standard may be lulled into thinking that just configuring its security keys is enough to prevent their devices from being hacked. A new report says it isn’t. Four protocols give enterprises a choice in LPWAN connectivity: cellular NB-IoT, LTE-M, and Sigfox, and the non-cellular LoRaWAN standard. Among these, the open LoRaWAN overwhelmingly dominates. Omdia (formerly IHS Markit – Technology) projects a “quite high forecast” for LoRa, said Lee Ratliff, senior principal analyst, connectivity and IoT.

Read More

Who should lead the push for IoT security?

Article | February 10, 2020

The ease with which internet of things devices can be compromised, coupled with the potentially extreme consequences of breaches, have prompted action from legislatures and regulators, but what group is best to decide? Both the makers of IoT devices and governments are aware of the security issues, but so far they haven’t come up with standardized ways to address them. The challenge of this market is that it’s moving so fast that no regulation is going to be able to keep pace with the devices that are being connected,” said Forrester vice president and research director Merritt Maxim. “Regulations that are definitive are easy to enforce and helpful, but they’ll quickly become outdated.”The latest such effort by a governmental body is a proposed regulation in the U.K. that would impose three major mandates on IoT device manufacturers that would address key security concerns.

Read More

IoT: Quench the thirst for smart water management

Article | April 7, 2020

Water is one of our most precious resources. Yet every year, we lose more than 126 million cubic meters globally to leaks, poor metering and theft. Beyond that is the energy wasted moving water that never gets used. It adds up to staggering economic – and environmental – costs. It also presents one of the most compelling opportunities to use industrial IoT solutions. Water utilities can use IoT to address two fundamental aspects of water management: maintaining the physical infrastructure and addressing water safety and sustainability. With IoT sensors throughout a water utility’s infrastructure, it becomes possible to. In many ways, these uses mirror what’s possible in manufacturing. But while factory floors are condensed environments – with all assets located in a confined area – water utilities operate highly distributed environments. Reservoirs, pipes, pumps and other assets are spread across a massive physical footprint. Such environments introduce some unique challenges. One of the most pressing is cost. Capturing data across a massive infrastructure – and moving it to the enterprise and/or cloud – is a heavy lift. That’s especially true when considering the criticality of timely transmission and analysis of water data. Any delay can contribute to continued losses.

Read More

The Rise of the AIoT

Article | March 3, 2020

Artificial intelligence (AI) has existed in the public consciousness for decades. The (mostly) sentient machines playing the villains in Hollywood movies have never been realistic depictions of the technology, but they have left an impression, nonetheless. AI has proved as exciting to the layman as it is to the expert. Usually based in remote data centers, AI is capable of collecting and examining immense volumes of data, generating insights based on analytical algorithms. With varying degrees of autonomy, these capabilities have been put to use streamlining decision-making processes. While AI is often thought of as a product in its own right, it is increasingly intersecting with other parallel trends. Chief among these is the Internet of things (IoT), which enables previously isolated machines to “talk” to one another and, at the same time, generate data that makes new modes of operation a possibility.

Read More

Spotlight

Vivio

Here at Vivio we understand the importance of keeping you connected. This means providing your people with the information and tools they need in order to do their jobs well, wherever they are.

Events