Internet of Secure Things

ALAN GRAU | March 1, 2016

article image
The Internet of Things (IoT) has become a ubiquitous term to describe the tens of billions of devices that have sensing or actuation capabilities, and are connected to each other via the Internet. The IoT includes everything from wearable fitness bands and smart home appliances to factory control devices, medical devices and even automobiles. Security has not been a high priority for these devices until now. It is now time to establish The Internet of Secure Things. There has been a lot of discussion regarding the hacking of devices and systems to obtain information and data. However, just as critical are cyber-attacks against the devices themselves - attacks which take over control of the device and cause them to operate in dangerous and insecure ways.

Spotlight

Advantest

For over a half century, Advantest has been designing innovative electronic measuring equipment and semiconductor test systems...

OTHER ARTICLES

Securing industrial networks: it’s a journey

Article | April 14, 2021

Trying to secure the industrial network in one go is like boiling the ocean. Better to view it as a journey. At each step in the journey, you’ll make incremental changes to people, process, and technology. Minimal security. This is the current state for most manufacturers. If you’re here, you’ve segmented the industrial network from the IT network. Traffic can’t cross from the IT network to the industrial network without clearing the DMZ. You can block malware from entering the industrial network. You can block malware from leaving the industrial network to infect the enterprise network. But if the industrial network is exposed to malicious software, you don’t have a way to contain it. That means the malware might affect multiple manufacturing cells or production lines — even multiple plants.

Read More

LIVING IN A SMARTER WORLD: WHY USE AI-ENABLED IOT IN HEALTHCARE

Article | April 14, 2021

Artificial Intelligence and Internet of things are hot topics now, as a consequence, integrating AI into IoT is becoming a common practice. The healthcare system is everybody’s business, so finding one's way around is equally important for all. Yet, keeping all the details in mind is no easy task. There are limits to human mental and physical performance. Thus going beyond one’s maximum has to be relegated to such technologies as the Internet of things and Artificial Intelligence. The implementation of innovative solutions in healthcare is always a good idea and IoT together with AI are strong drivers of the digital transformation regardless of what field the technologies are applied in. Municipal infrastructure, smart homes, retailing, manufacturing, supply chain, education, healthcare and life sciences — the entire digital ecosystem, an IoT ecosystem of connected devices, has been created and is growing stronger with each passing day. Empowered with Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning, among other things, IoT is used as a means of equipping people with intelligent assistance. Gradually, it is taking over both minor and major processes in a number of industries. Healthcare is no exception.

Read More

Smart Home Technologies: Zigbee, Z-Wave, Thread, and Dotdot

Article | April 14, 2021

If you own smart home products like SmartThings or Nest, you may be familiar with some of the technologies behind them. Network protocols like Zigbee and Z-Wave dominate the industry, while Thread, a younger network standard, is gaining headway as a strong contender in the battle for market share. Although this may seem like your typical rivalry between industry leaders, the competitive landscape is more complicated than selecting one over another.

Read More

Microsoft acquires ReFirm Labs to enhance IoT security

Article | April 14, 2021

Modern computing devices can be thought of as a collection of discrete microprocessors each with a dedicated function like high-speed networking, graphics, Disk I/O, AI, and everything in between. The emergence of the intelligent edge has accelerated the number of these cloud-connected devices that contain multiple specialized sub-processors each with its own firmware layer and often a custom operating system. Many vulnerability analysis and endpoint detection and response (EDR) tools find it challenging to monitor and protect devices at the firmware level, leading to an attractive security gap for attackers to exploit. At the same time, we have also seen growth in the number of attacks against firmware where sensitive information like credentials and encryption keys are stored in memory. A recent survey commissioned by Microsoft of 1,000 security decision-makers found that 83 percent had experienced some level of firmware security incident, but only 29 percent are allocating resources to protect that critical layer. And according to March 2021 data from the National Vulnerability Database included in a presentation from the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Agency (CISA) at the 2021 RSA, difficult-to-patch firmware attacks are continuing to rise. Microsoft’s Azure Defender for IoT team (formerly CyberX) recently announced alongside the Department of Homeland Security a series of more than 25 critical severity vulnerabilities in IoT and OT devices

Read More

Spotlight

Advantest

For over a half century, Advantest has been designing innovative electronic measuring equipment and semiconductor test systems...

Events