Is the Internet of Things in Your Home? Or on Your Body?

SARAH SNOW | March 1, 2016

article image
Are machines communicating with each other at your house? Is a technology that you wear on your body communicating with your computer? The Internet of Things is here. “There’s currently a whole lot of capital moving around the IoT tech sector, over 800 companies are working on IoT devices and platforms, and new IoT components come on the market on a regular basis,” according to an article on appaccessories.co.uk. This infographic, also from appaccessories.co.uk, includes a good visual summary of the current state of the Internet of Things, dividing it into categories. “In fact, we think it’s safe to say that there are 15 separate IoT categories — everything from fitness to health care to really cool toys,” according the article. “Of these 15 distinct groupings, the home category is the largest by a wide margin, with nearly 140 companies working on smart home products.”

Spotlight

ST-Ericsson

ST-Ericsson is an industry leader in design, development and creation of cutting edge mobile platforms and semiconductors across the broad spectrum of wireless technologies. Established in 2009, ST-Ericsson is a 50/50 joint venture uniting the wireless semiconductor division of STMicroelectronics (ST-NXP Wireless) and the mobile platform division of Ericsson (Ericsson Mobile Platforms). Today, the company is a key supplier to industry leaders, including mobile operators and device manufacturers, and we are actively engaged with seven of the top nine OEM manufacturers by revenue.

OTHER ARTICLES

Nokia adds 5G to worldwide IoT network, lets carriers test new sensors

Article | March 17, 2020

Nokia may be best known for cellular phones, but in recent years the Finnish company has focused on networking hardware — the radios and infrastructure that connect cellular devices to the internet. Today, Nokia announced that it’s augmenting its Worldwide Internet of Things Network Grid (WING) with new 5G capabilities, enabling cellular carriers to offer global-scale 5G IoT services to customers without building out their own networks. While that’s a lot of jargon to absorb at once, the gist is that carriers like AT&T and Verizon want to offer business customers the ability to connect small IoT sensors to the internet but don’t necessarily want to spend the money to build the cellular infrastructure the sensors need to communicate. So Nokia offers WING as a global IoT infrastructure, partnering with carriers to sell access on a pay-as-you-go basis.

Read More

From outside-in to inside-out: My take on IoT

Article | March 31, 2020

At IDC I co-founded a practice that studied the three dimensions of IoT: industry technology platforms, industry verticals and industry geographies. As an industry analyst, I had a front-row ticket to the IoT market and continually witnessed incredible innovations. Like many other experts, I kept my seatbelt buckled for what we expected to be IoT’s massive and dramatic take-off. While there has been uptake, real-world adoption and implementation have lagged the “hype.” In time, I found myself growing increasingly frustrated at the disconnect. What was the holdup? Knowing that industry analysts are beholden to the marketing messages that each company shares, I welcomed an opportunity to make the move from an outside-in analyst to an inside-out contributor.

Read More

Future ‘smart walls’ key to IoT

Article | February 10, 2020

IoT equipment designers shooting for efficiency should explore the potential for using buildings as antennas, researchers say. Environmental surfaces such as walls can be used to intercept and beam signals, which can increase reliability and data throughput for devices, according to MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL).Researchers at CSAIL have been working on a smart-surface repeating antenna array called RFocus. The antennas, which could be applied in sheets like wallpaper, are designed to be incorporated into office spaces and factories. Radios that broadcast signals could then become smaller and less power intensive.

Read More

What is Google Pigweed? Google’s unveils new toys for IoT developers

Article | April 3, 2020

One might be forgiven for thinking that Google had enough operating systems. Other than Android, Google also owns Chrome OS and Google Fuchsia – the latter of which isn’t even finished yet! But then came murmurs of a project called Pigweed, following a Google trademark that surfaced in February this year. At first, speculation was rife that this was yet another operating system, due to wording that described it as “computer operating software.” Now we know that is not the case. So what is Google Pigweed? In a recent blog post, Google officially threw back the curtain. Google Pigweed, it turns out, is a collection of embedded platform developer tools for development on 32-bit microcontrollers. Effectively, these are libraries targeted at Internet of Things (IoT) applications.

Read More

Spotlight

ST-Ericsson

ST-Ericsson is an industry leader in design, development and creation of cutting edge mobile platforms and semiconductors across the broad spectrum of wireless technologies. Established in 2009, ST-Ericsson is a 50/50 joint venture uniting the wireless semiconductor division of STMicroelectronics (ST-NXP Wireless) and the mobile platform division of Ericsson (Ericsson Mobile Platforms). Today, the company is a key supplier to industry leaders, including mobile operators and device manufacturers, and we are actively engaged with seven of the top nine OEM manufacturers by revenue.

Events