Leading the IoT

| July 17, 2019

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The Internet of Things (IoT) has rapidly become one of the most familiar — and perhaps most hyped — expressions across business and technology. We expect to see 20 billion internet-connected things by 2020. These “things” are not general-purpose devices, such as smartphones and PCs, but dedicated-function objects, such as vending machines, jet engines, connected cars and a myriad of other examples.

Spotlight

MQTT

MQTT stands for MQ Telemetry Transport. It is a publish/subscribe, extremely simple and lightweight messaging protocol, designed for constrained devices and low-bandwidth, high-latency or unreliable networks. The design principles are to minimise network bandwidth and device resource requirements whilst also attempting to ensure reliability and some degree of assurance of delivery. These principles also turn out to make the protocol ideal of the emerging “machine-to-machine” (M2M) or “Internet of Things” world of connected devices, and for mobile applications where bandwidth and battery power are at a premium.

OTHER ARTICLES

Future ‘smart walls’ key to IoT

Article | February 10, 2020

IoT equipment designers shooting for efficiency should explore the potential for using buildings as antennas, researchers say. Environmental surfaces such as walls can be used to intercept and beam signals, which can increase reliability and data throughput for devices, according to MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL).Researchers at CSAIL have been working on a smart-surface repeating antenna array called RFocus. The antennas, which could be applied in sheets like wallpaper, are designed to be incorporated into office spaces and factories. Radios that broadcast signals could then become smaller and less power intensive.

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IoT Security Flaws Are Putting Your Business at Risk

Article | February 10, 2020

As industries invest in the next generation of technology, the internet of things is at the top of the list. Once a novelty best known in residential settings, IoT technology has become mainstream in business and industry. Some even predict that having a Google Home or Amazon Echo in the conference room will become the norm. Now, you will find connected devices in Amazon’s warehouse robotics system Kiva, Airbus’ Factory of the Future and the augmented reality used by Caterpillar in its Cat Connect system. The number of IoT devices in use by 2025 could reach 22 billion, according to an IoT Analytics report. They will transform manufacturing, warehouse and logistics, health care, agriculture, shipping, energy and aviation. IoT security can’t be done as an afterthought; it must be integrated into operations from Day One because connected devices and systems use cryptographic keys that transmit data. Cybercriminals can gain access through these keys, allowing them to infect devices and systems with malware, steal data or shut down systems. Sometimes, the vulnerability has gone undetected for months.

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Industry deep dives at IoT Exchange

Article | February 10, 2020

Your industry is unique. Chances are, it even has its own language. That’s why you want information geared toward your unique sector. At IBM, we have deep industry expertise that we’ve curated into specialized teams focused to cognitive technology in vertical spaces. This year, we’re proud to host Industry Day at IoT Exchange for the Automotive, Aerospace & Defense and Electronics industries. Industry Day at IoT Exchange 2020 features tailored activities across three industry workgroups. Clients who are under the IBM Feedback Program Agreement (FPA) can meet with IBM leaders to share best practices and experiences, and to help shape the future of IBM industry solutions. These user groups provide you the opportunity to influence the direction for emerging technology. Note: this is not a general admission program. So if you’d like to participate, you’ll want to complete the contact form. A member of our client programs team will contact you.

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Run-Time Provisioning of Security Credentials for IoT Devices

Article | February 10, 2020

To prevent counterfeit devices from joining a network or to limit the opportunity for network attacks, it’s important to authenticate devices attempting to join Internet of Things (IoT) networks and subsequently connect only authorized devices. The standard mechanism to securely authenticate clients connecting to a server is transport-layer-security (TLS) client-side authentication. To implement such authentication in an IoT network, the appropriate certificate authority (CA)—usually the IoT device provider—issues a unique X.509 certificate to each IoT device and the associated private key that functions as a unique security credential for the IoT device. Once the certificate and associated private key are stored on the IoT device, it may use them during the TLS client-authentication process to securely join the IoT network.

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Spotlight

MQTT

MQTT stands for MQ Telemetry Transport. It is a publish/subscribe, extremely simple and lightweight messaging protocol, designed for constrained devices and low-bandwidth, high-latency or unreliable networks. The design principles are to minimise network bandwidth and device resource requirements whilst also attempting to ensure reliability and some degree of assurance of delivery. These principles also turn out to make the protocol ideal of the emerging “machine-to-machine” (M2M) or “Internet of Things” world of connected devices, and for mobile applications where bandwidth and battery power are at a premium.

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