Leveraging the Internet of Things for a More Efficient and Effective Military

DENISE E. ZHENG, WILLIAM A. CARTER |

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The Internet of Things (IoT) is transforming the way that organizations communicate, collaborate, and coordinate everyday business and industrial processes. Adoption of IoT technologies has proven well suited to organizations that manage large numbers of assets and coordinate complex and distributed processes. From monitoring machines on a factory floor to tracking supply chains to automating sophisticated, and often dangerous, industrial processes, IoT technologies are optimizing the performance of equipment, improving efficiency, and protecting the safety of workers. Decades ago, the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) played a critical role in pioneering the sensor, computer networking, and communications technology that serve as the foundation of IoT. In the late 1990s, the Department articulated a vision for “network-centric” warfare that integrated three domains—physical, information, and cognitive—to enhance information sharing and collaboration. Network-centric warfare has been a driving force behind recent defense transformation and has led to the adoption of IoT-related technologies in key areas.

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OTHER ARTICLES

Microsoft acquires ReFirm Labs to enhance IoT security

Article | June 2, 2021

Modern computing devices can be thought of as a collection of discrete microprocessors each with a dedicated function like high-speed networking, graphics, Disk I/O, AI, and everything in between. The emergence of the intelligent edge has accelerated the number of these cloud-connected devices that contain multiple specialized sub-processors each with its own firmware layer and often a custom operating system. Many vulnerability analysis and endpoint detection and response (EDR) tools find it challenging to monitor and protect devices at the firmware level, leading to an attractive security gap for attackers to exploit. At the same time, we have also seen growth in the number of attacks against firmware where sensitive information like credentials and encryption keys are stored in memory. A recent survey commissioned by Microsoft of 1,000 security decision-makers found that 83 percent had experienced some level of firmware security incident, but only 29 percent are allocating resources to protect that critical layer. And according to March 2021 data from the National Vulnerability Database included in a presentation from the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Agency (CISA) at the 2021 RSA, difficult-to-patch firmware attacks are continuing to rise. Microsoft’s Azure Defender for IoT team (formerly CyberX) recently announced alongside the Department of Homeland Security a series of more than 25 critical severity vulnerabilities in IoT and OT devices

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Breaking Down IoT Standards and Protocols

Article | June 2, 2021

The Internet of Things has given rise to a host of new standards and protocols. Still more protocols that originally existed for other purposes but are well suited to new IoT applications have been adopted by device manufacturers and application creators. Though in some senses IoT devices are the same as any other internet-connected device, the bandwidth, power, and transmission distance constraints inherent in many IoT applications require novel new solutions to the fundamental actions of connectivity, data transfer, device discovery, and communication. This article will serve as a brief glossary of terms related to IoT communication protocols and standards. Click here for a more complete introduction to connectivity options.

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Automotive Cyber Security: A Crash Course on Protecting Cars Against Hackers

Article | June 2, 2021

Modern cars have dozens of computers on board, and they’re not just for running GPS or playing music. Computers monitor and control nearly every system on your vehicle, including steering, brakes, and the engine itself. This is why automotive cyber security is essential. If a vehicle’s computer systems aren’t properly protected, hackers can steal data or even take control of the vehicle. As you can imagine, that makes automotive cyber security a major concern for consumers, auto companies, and OEMs alike. But what is there to know about automotive cyber security? We’ll explore what cybersecurity in the automotive industry entails and what the biggest threats are to automotive IoT and connected vehicles. We’ll also share some insights from a recent webinar by Sectigo and Mentor Graphics on how to protect connected vehicles from emerging cybersecurity threats.

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Scalable Software with Devops for Industrial IoT

Article | June 2, 2021

Scaling Industrial IoT (IIoT) solutions requires a DevOps organization that can manage increased software and hardware complexity in terms of capability, capacity and footprint. DevOps is derived from Development and Operations and is one of the buzz words for ICT companies. Often it is the amalgamation of Software Developers from R&D and senior engineers from Operations into a new organization. Startups are faced with the challenge of how to quickly create a functioning DevOps organization that can scale with rapid growth. In this article, we will deal with the keys for success to scale software solutions with using an example of an Industrial IoT solution. We will look at how DevOps should function and discuss the important principles for software development, tools and operations.

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NTT Communications provides enterprise cloud services, network infrastructure and security services to optimize the IT environments of enterprises.

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