M2M and the Supply Chain

| March 1, 2016

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The adoption of M2M and the flexibility it offers represents one of the simplest and most straightforward ways to enable collaboration and overcome the barriers that hinder the sharing of valuable data between supply chain partners. M2Mbased solutions also address the latency and reliability issues that often arise when attempting to accomplish this sharing through human intervention. M2M technologies are affordable, secure, and can be implemented non-intrusively, without disrupting existing operational processes. Not just technology for its own sake, businesses are finally recognizing the power and potential of M2M and what it provides in terms of its ability to connect us not only to each other, but to every level of our enterprise.

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Wireless Things

Wireless Things are proud to announce that having been acquired by 365 Agile Ltd in February of 2015, the company has floated on AIM, and is now part of the publicly listed 365 Agile Group PLC.

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Spotlight

Wireless Things

Wireless Things are proud to announce that having been acquired by 365 Agile Ltd in February of 2015, the company has floated on AIM, and is now part of the publicly listed 365 Agile Group PLC.

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