Maximizing ROI with IoT

JASON LYNGAAS |

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We’ve talked a lot about taking a phased approach to IoT adoption. One reason (of many) is that only 8% of companies use more than 25% of the IoT data they collect, according to recent market research. So the vast majority of companies invest in IoT, only to see a bunch of information on a dashboard an adoption shortfall that leaves extensive untapped ROI potential on the table, right alongside all that unused data.

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The road to industrial IoT security

Article | February 25, 2020

One of the main topics of this year’s RSA Conference is IT-OT cybersecurity convergence. But what are we talking about? Industrial IoT (IIoT) is all around us: in water, in gas, and electricity distribution networks, running power plants and critical infrastructure, in production lines and transportation networks, and more. In the traditional IT world, security risks involve threats that would undermine the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of data and systems. Given that in 2019, $3.5 billion was lost to known cyber-scams and ransomware according to the FBI’s Internet Crime Report, the impact is largely financial. IIoT drives the physical world where operational technologies (OT) are used. The risk in IIoT environments involves threats that would undermine the operational safety (physical security of goods and people, environmental impact) and the availability or even the physical integrity of the production process. Theft of intellectual property and trade secrets is a major concern, and the impact is not just financial, but also social, human, and ecological.

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DEPLOYING MACHINE LEARNING TO HANDLE INFLUX OF IOT DATA

Article | February 25, 2020

The Internet of Things is gradually penetrating every aspect of our lives. With the growth in numbers of internet-connected sensors built into cars, planes, trains, and buildings, we can say it is everywhere. Be it smart thermostats or smart coffee makers, IoT devices are marching ahead into mainstream adoption. But, these devices are far from perfect. Currently, there is a lot of manual input required to achieve optimal functionality — there is not a lot of intelligence built-in. You must set your alarm, tell your coffee maker when to start brewing, and manually set schedules for your thermostat, all independently and precisely.

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IoT Adoption: Before and After COVID-19

Article | February 25, 2020

The survey data I’m referring to comes from a study conducted by the Eclipse Foundation about the adoption of commercial Internet of Things (IoT) technology. The aim of the study was to get a better understanding of the IoT industry landscape by identifying the requirements, priorities, and challenges faced by organizations deploying and using commercial IoT technologies. More than 350 respondents from multiple industries responded, with about a quarter of respondents coming from industrial production businesses. While this survey was not solely focused on the manufacturing and processing industries, its results reflect the general business community’s IoT adoption at the end of 2019. As such, it is a pre-COVID-19 snapshot of IoT adoption.

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More Than Half of IoT Devices Vulnerable to Severe Attacks

Article | February 25, 2020

More than half of all internet of things (IoT) devices are vulnerable to medium- or high-severity attacks, meaning that enterprises are sitting on a “ticking IoT time bomb,” according to Palo Alto Networks Unit 42 research team. In new research released Tuesday, researchers said that several deep-rooted issues exist around connected devices, both used by general enterprises and in medical environments. At the most basic level researchers found that 98 percent of all IoT device traffic is unencrypted, exposing personal and confidential data on the network. Other issues, like the reliance on outdated legacy protocols and operating systems, are opening up organizations up to older attack techniques that IT teams may not have had to deal with in years. For instance, researchers outlined one attack they discovered of a connected mammogram machine, used in a hospital, by the Conficker worm (malware first discovered more than a decade ago).

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Cedrus—a highly sought-after Digital Transformation Solutions provider within North America and abroad—has created a reputation for being able to solve complex business challenges for many of the world’s largest healthcare organizations, financial and insurance companies, and more.

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