ON Semiconductor Bluetooth® Low Energy Technology for Ultra-Low Power IoT Applications

| November 13, 2018

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ON Semiconductor’s RSL10 SIP is a complete Bluetooth® Low Energy wireless system-in-package including a 2.4GHz radio transceiver, antenna and passive components. This is the easiest way to implement the industry’s lowest-power Bluetooth 5 Low Energy technology in wireless communication applications.

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ivee

At ivee, we work at the intersection of artificial intelligence, speech recognition, natural language understanding, and the Internet of Things. Since 2011, ivee (www.helloivee.com) has made voice-activated alarm clocks. Our products are currently sold through stores like Staples, Best Buy, and Brookstone. But that’s just the beginning.

OTHER ARTICLES

Cloud suppliers' share of IoT data and analytics revenues to top $56 billion by 2026

Article | February 26, 2020

A new report from ABI Research predicts that cloud platform suppliers will see a more than $50 billion increase in their share of IoT data and analytics revenue by 2026.Companies providing cloud services have spent years building out their investments in the IoT space and continue to make headway in spreading cloud usage throughout the IoT value chain. The figures come from ABI Research's IoT Analytics and Data Management Services Strategies of Major Cloud Suppliers application analysis report, which examined the competitive outlook of the cloud vendor market and recent acquisitions. The report takes an in-depth look at how leading cloud providers like AWS, Azure, Oracle, Cisco, Huawei, SAP, Google, PTC, Cloudera are positioned in the IoT market and it compares the tools and services offered by each company. It is designed to help IoT companies figure out who the market leaders are, which cloud platforms would be most relevant for their particular industry and revenue forecasts from 2019 until 2026 for IoT integration, storage, analytics, presentation and professional services.

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Smart Building Initiatives are the Building Blocks of a Smart City

Article | April 8, 2020

To paraphrase a well-known saying, the journey to a complete smart city begins with a single building. No matter the size of the city, the extent of the technology or the most helpful use cases, a prospective smart city can integrate into — or branch off of — initiatives pushed forward by a smart building or campus. And when there is an increasing demand for these types of solutions, large corporations have the opportunity to improve corporate and social governance practices, as well as stand out in their community by championing more connected technologies.

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AI and IoT projects optimize industries inside and out

Article | March 11, 2020

When people think of AI, it's easy to jump to the many possible uses seen in movies -- such as accessing secret areas with biometric data or robots completing human jobs -- but applying AI realistically requires architects and administrators to understand just how flexible AI is in a business setting. Tech leaders have rapidly increased the number of AI and IoT projects in many areas of their businesses, including customer experience, data analysis and security. When organizations apply AI into these different aspects, they can more effectively process the IoT data they create and further improve their operations and products. Popular movies have made customer experience AI one of the better-known examples of AI. Ads may not be as flashy as the personally tailored ones using customer biometrics as seen in The Minority Report, but it's easy to see how organizations will get there from the online ads that use AI to give consumers offers specific to their interests. Businesses use AI that learns from data analytics on customer behavior throughout the IoT customer journey.

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The $6trn importance of security standards and regulation in the IoT era

Article | March 16, 2020

We live in an era of digital transformation where more and more devices are connecting to bring new and innovative levels of service and efficiency. This transformation spans across all markets and the rate of progress is breath-taking, says David Maidment, director, secure device ecosystem at Arm.This change brings huge benefits, but it also brings threats in the shape of an expanding cybercrime footprint. Every connected device is a hack potential. Rather than attacking traditional IT equipment, the cybercrime threats start to move to all aspects of our lives. It is predicted that by 2021 there will already be US$6 trillion (€5.37 trillion) of cybercrime damage (Source: Cybersecurity Ventures Official Annual Cybercrime Report), which is a staggering number pinned against financial loss for businesses, without considering the damage to reputation and other harder-to-measure statistics.

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Spotlight

ivee

At ivee, we work at the intersection of artificial intelligence, speech recognition, natural language understanding, and the Internet of Things. Since 2011, ivee (www.helloivee.com) has made voice-activated alarm clocks. Our products are currently sold through stores like Staples, Best Buy, and Brookstone. But that’s just the beginning.

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