Smart Cities and Communities White Paper

| March 12, 2018

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As cities move to embrace smart city technologies and Internet of Things (IoT) solutions, they need to understand the new data challenges associated with these projects. In this white paper, we explore the drivers and reasons to implement a Smart City Data strategy and architecture for tangible city and community improvements, not just a science experiment.

Spotlight

IoT-A - Internet of Things Architecture

IoT-A’s overall technical objective is to create the architectural foundations of the Future Internet of Things, allowing seamless integration of heterogeneous IoT technologies into a coherent architecture and their federation with other systems of the Future Internet.

OTHER ARTICLES

WiFi for Enterprise IoT: Why You Shouldn’t Use It

Article | April 9, 2020

So you’re building an IoT solution and you’re ready to select your connectivity approach. Should you use Bluetooth? WiFi? LoRa? Cellular? Satellite? As I’ve explored in a previous post, the connectivity approach you choose ultimately comes down to the specific needs of your use case. Some use cases favor mobility and bandwidth, and power consumption doesn’t matter as much. Other use cases favor extensive battery life and broad coverage, and bandwidth doesn’t matter as much. In this post, I argue that for Enterprise IoT solutions, you shouldn’t use WiFi regardless of the use case. To build and implement a successful IoT solution, your connectivity needs to be reliable and consistent. When there’s an issue that needs troubleshooting, knowing that certain components of your IoT solution are reliable and consistent enables you to narrow your focus and address issues more effectively. There are many challenges in IoT, many of which stem from operational challenges and from having thousands of devices out in the real world where they’re subject to harsh, ever-changing environments.

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Who should lead the push for IoT security?

Article | April 9, 2020

The ease with which internet of things devices can be compromised, coupled with the potentially extreme consequences of breaches, have prompted action from legislatures and regulators, but what group is best to decide? Both the makers of IoT devices and governments are aware of the security issues, but so far they haven’t come up with standardized ways to address them. The challenge of this market is that it’s moving so fast that no regulation is going to be able to keep pace with the devices that are being connected,” said Forrester vice president and research director Merritt Maxim. “Regulations that are definitive are easy to enforce and helpful, but they’ll quickly become outdated.”The latest such effort by a governmental body is a proposed regulation in the U.K. that would impose three major mandates on IoT device manufacturers that would address key security concerns.

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Nokia adds 5G to worldwide IoT network, lets carriers test new sensors

Article | April 9, 2020

Nokia may be best known for cellular phones, but in recent years the Finnish company has focused on networking hardware — the radios and infrastructure that connect cellular devices to the internet. Today, Nokia announced that it’s augmenting its Worldwide Internet of Things Network Grid (WING) with new 5G capabilities, enabling cellular carriers to offer global-scale 5G IoT services to customers without building out their own networks. While that’s a lot of jargon to absorb at once, the gist is that carriers like AT&T and Verizon want to offer business customers the ability to connect small IoT sensors to the internet but don’t necessarily want to spend the money to build the cellular infrastructure the sensors need to communicate. So Nokia offers WING as a global IoT infrastructure, partnering with carriers to sell access on a pay-as-you-go basis.

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What is Google Pigweed? Google’s unveils new toys for IoT developers

Article | April 9, 2020

One might be forgiven for thinking that Google had enough operating systems. Other than Android, Google also owns Chrome OS and Google Fuchsia – the latter of which isn’t even finished yet! But then came murmurs of a project called Pigweed, following a Google trademark that surfaced in February this year. At first, speculation was rife that this was yet another operating system, due to wording that described it as “computer operating software.” Now we know that is not the case. So what is Google Pigweed? In a recent blog post, Google officially threw back the curtain. Google Pigweed, it turns out, is a collection of embedded platform developer tools for development on 32-bit microcontrollers. Effectively, these are libraries targeted at Internet of Things (IoT) applications.

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Spotlight

IoT-A - Internet of Things Architecture

IoT-A’s overall technical objective is to create the architectural foundations of the Future Internet of Things, allowing seamless integration of heterogeneous IoT technologies into a coherent architecture and their federation with other systems of the Future Internet.

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