Smart Cities and the journey to the “Cloud”

| November 1, 2017

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“Smart city” is a term with varied implications. But the underlying technology, with its ability to provide a 360° view of every aspect of city operations and improve quality of life, has moved beyond science fiction. Today, it offers hope for struggling urban centers. Imagine a city where interconnected technology works seamlessly to improve public safety, transportation, energy efficiency, economic development and operating expenses. Cities such as Singapore, London and San Francisco, smart technology is already solving problems. With its ability to track everything from cleanliness to traffic, the digital infrastructure of smart cities can create safer, healthier, more informed communities while generating data of tremendous value to the public and private sectors.

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Nokia adds 5G to worldwide IoT network, lets carriers test new sensors

Article | March 17, 2020

Nokia may be best known for cellular phones, but in recent years the Finnish company has focused on networking hardware — the radios and infrastructure that connect cellular devices to the internet. Today, Nokia announced that it’s augmenting its Worldwide Internet of Things Network Grid (WING) with new 5G capabilities, enabling cellular carriers to offer global-scale 5G IoT services to customers without building out their own networks. While that’s a lot of jargon to absorb at once, the gist is that carriers like AT&T and Verizon want to offer business customers the ability to connect small IoT sensors to the internet but don’t necessarily want to spend the money to build the cellular infrastructure the sensors need to communicate. So Nokia offers WING as a global IoT infrastructure, partnering with carriers to sell access on a pay-as-you-go basis.

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Run-Time Provisioning of Security Credentials for IoT Devices

Article | March 20, 2020

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The Rise of the AIoT

Article | March 3, 2020

Artificial intelligence (AI) has existed in the public consciousness for decades. The (mostly) sentient machines playing the villains in Hollywood movies have never been realistic depictions of the technology, but they have left an impression, nonetheless. AI has proved as exciting to the layman as it is to the expert. Usually based in remote data centers, AI is capable of collecting and examining immense volumes of data, generating insights based on analytical algorithms. With varying degrees of autonomy, these capabilities have been put to use streamlining decision-making processes. While AI is often thought of as a product in its own right, it is increasingly intersecting with other parallel trends. Chief among these is the Internet of things (IoT), which enables previously isolated machines to “talk” to one another and, at the same time, generate data that makes new modes of operation a possibility.

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IoT Standards and Protocols Explained

Article | April 13, 2021

For businesses, the transformative power of IoT is increasingly significant with the promise of improving operational efficiency and visibility, while reducing costs. However, IoT does not come without risks and challenges. While concerns over security and data privacy continue to rise, the lack of IoT standards remains one of the biggest hurdles. The increasing number of legacy, single-vendor, and proprietary solutions cause problems with disparate systems, data silos and security gaps. As IoT successes become more dependent on seamless interoperability and data-sharing among different systems, we want to avoid the scenario of a fragmented market with numerous solutions that simply don’t work with each other.

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ClariPhy Communications

ClariPhy Communications, Inc. develops mixed signal, advanced digital signal processing (MXSP) SoCs targeting multi-mode, multi-rate high performance optical network applications...

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