The Business Case for the Internet of Things

| May 13, 2016

article image
As companies do everything they can to retain and expand relationships with existing customers – their most valuable assets – new business models and value-added services are coming to the forefront, and bringing with them significant new opportunities for the enterprise. Machine-to-machine (M2M) technology and the Internet of Things (IoT) is creating new opportunities for companies to enhance their services, gain business insights, improve business processes, and differentiate their offerings. In fact, connecting machines is bringing companies closer to their customers while delivering real ROI and payback.

Spotlight

Trusted Computing Group

The Trusted Computing Group (TCG) is a global organization that develops open security standards and specifications based on root of trust enabling secure interoperable systems and networks across industries. The TCG category of secure computing has created billions of secure endpoints across industries and technologies.

OTHER ARTICLES

What is Google Pigweed? Google’s unveils new toys for IoT developers

Article | April 3, 2020

One might be forgiven for thinking that Google had enough operating systems. Other than Android, Google also owns Chrome OS and Google Fuchsia – the latter of which isn’t even finished yet! But then came murmurs of a project called Pigweed, following a Google trademark that surfaced in February this year. At first, speculation was rife that this was yet another operating system, due to wording that described it as “computer operating software.” Now we know that is not the case. So what is Google Pigweed? In a recent blog post, Google officially threw back the curtain. Google Pigweed, it turns out, is a collection of embedded platform developer tools for development on 32-bit microcontrollers. Effectively, these are libraries targeted at Internet of Things (IoT) applications.

Read More

Run-Time Provisioning of Security Credentials for IoT Devices

Article | April 3, 2020

To prevent counterfeit devices from joining a network or to limit the opportunity for network attacks, it’s important to authenticate devices attempting to join Internet of Things (IoT) networks and subsequently connect only authorized devices. The standard mechanism to securely authenticate clients connecting to a server is transport-layer-security (TLS) client-side authentication. To implement such authentication in an IoT network, the appropriate certificate authority (CA)—usually the IoT device provider—issues a unique X.509 certificate to each IoT device and the associated private key that functions as a unique security credential for the IoT device. Once the certificate and associated private key are stored on the IoT device, it may use them during the TLS client-authentication process to securely join the IoT network.

Read More

From outside-in to inside-out: My take on IoT

Article | April 3, 2020

At IDC I co-founded a practice that studied the three dimensions of IoT: industry technology platforms, industry verticals and industry geographies. As an industry analyst, I had a front-row ticket to the IoT market and continually witnessed incredible innovations. Like many other experts, I kept my seatbelt buckled for what we expected to be IoT’s massive and dramatic take-off. While there has been uptake, real-world adoption and implementation have lagged the “hype.” In time, I found myself growing increasingly frustrated at the disconnect. What was the holdup? Knowing that industry analysts are beholden to the marketing messages that each company shares, I welcomed an opportunity to make the move from an outside-in analyst to an inside-out contributor.

Read More

The $6trn importance of security standards and regulation in the IoT era

Article | April 3, 2020

We live in an era of digital transformation where more and more devices are connecting to bring new and innovative levels of service and efficiency. This transformation spans across all markets and the rate of progress is breath-taking, says David Maidment, director, secure device ecosystem at Arm.This change brings huge benefits, but it also brings threats in the shape of an expanding cybercrime footprint. Every connected device is a hack potential. Rather than attacking traditional IT equipment, the cybercrime threats start to move to all aspects of our lives. It is predicted that by 2021 there will already be US$6 trillion (€5.37 trillion) of cybercrime damage (Source: Cybersecurity Ventures Official Annual Cybercrime Report), which is a staggering number pinned against financial loss for businesses, without considering the damage to reputation and other harder-to-measure statistics.

Read More

Spotlight

Trusted Computing Group

The Trusted Computing Group (TCG) is a global organization that develops open security standards and specifications based on root of trust enabling secure interoperable systems and networks across industries. The TCG category of secure computing has created billions of secure endpoints across industries and technologies.

Events