The Internet of Things A Study in Hype Reality Disruption and Growt.

| May 9, 2016

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The confluence of efficient wireless protocols, improved sensors, cheaper processors, and a bevy of startups and established companies developing the necessary management and application software has finally made the concept of the Internet of Things (IoT) mainstream.

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Frailties of LoRaWAN IoT Devices

Article | March 5, 2020

Low-power wide-area networks (LPWANs) are helping drive the Internet of things (IoT) explosion. They connect millions of low-power IoT and Industrial IoT (IIoT) devices into wireless networks over a range of distances, from short to really, really long, from indoor applications to those covering large fields or even cities. But device designers using the LoRaWAN standard may be lulled into thinking that just configuring its security keys is enough to prevent their devices from being hacked. A new report says it isn’t. Four protocols give enterprises a choice in LPWAN connectivity: cellular NB-IoT, LTE-M, and Sigfox, and the non-cellular LoRaWAN standard. Among these, the open LoRaWAN overwhelmingly dominates. Omdia (formerly IHS Markit – Technology) projects a “quite high forecast” for LoRa, said Lee Ratliff, senior principal analyst, connectivity and IoT.

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IoT as a Service: Lowering the Cost Barrier of IoT for Small and Mid-Sized Businesses

Article | March 5, 2020

There are already 20 billion IoT-connected devices, and 8 billion of those are devices used by enterprises, according to a report by Gartner. The impact of the Internet of Things market is potentially $11 trillion by 2025. The investment in IoT has come primarily from large businesses, but the technology is increasingly available via ‘as-a-service’, making it possible for businesses of all sizes to benefit. The ‘as-a-service’ model reduces the cost of ownership and capital expenditures and makes it easy for small businesses to investigate IoT with smaller up-font investments and less risk. Frank Della Rosa, research director at IDC, said that “Software as a Service (SaaS) continues to be the most highly deployed cloud segment, representing a commanding 62.4% of the total cloud market revenues.”

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Nokia adds 5G to worldwide IoT network, lets carriers test new sensors

Article | March 5, 2020

Nokia may be best known for cellular phones, but in recent years the Finnish company has focused on networking hardware — the radios and infrastructure that connect cellular devices to the internet. Today, Nokia announced that it’s augmenting its Worldwide Internet of Things Network Grid (WING) with new 5G capabilities, enabling cellular carriers to offer global-scale 5G IoT services to customers without building out their own networks. While that’s a lot of jargon to absorb at once, the gist is that carriers like AT&T and Verizon want to offer business customers the ability to connect small IoT sensors to the internet but don’t necessarily want to spend the money to build the cellular infrastructure the sensors need to communicate. So Nokia offers WING as a global IoT infrastructure, partnering with carriers to sell access on a pay-as-you-go basis.

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The $6trn importance of security standards and regulation in the IoT era

Article | March 5, 2020

We live in an era of digital transformation where more and more devices are connecting to bring new and innovative levels of service and efficiency. This transformation spans across all markets and the rate of progress is breath-taking, says David Maidment, director, secure device ecosystem at Arm.This change brings huge benefits, but it also brings threats in the shape of an expanding cybercrime footprint. Every connected device is a hack potential. Rather than attacking traditional IT equipment, the cybercrime threats start to move to all aspects of our lives. It is predicted that by 2021 there will already be US$6 trillion (€5.37 trillion) of cybercrime damage (Source: Cybersecurity Ventures Official Annual Cybercrime Report), which is a staggering number pinned against financial loss for businesses, without considering the damage to reputation and other harder-to-measure statistics.

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