THE INTERNET OF THINGS: THE 4 SECURITY DIMENSIONS OF SMART DEVICES

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The internet of things (iot) plays an important role in this trend, through the emergence of numerous connected devices. The figures are indeed tremendous: many analysts consider there will be between 20 and 200 billion connected devices in the world by 2020. No industry can ignore this trend today, and enterprises are seizing the opportunity.Once the setting and the use cases are clear, security questions have to be addressed. In this regard, one relevant reference is the “IoT Project” launched by the non-profit organization OWASP (Open Web Application Security Project). It includes an interesting and comprehensive – although precise – list of security recommendations.

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Microsoft acquires ReFirm Labs to enhance IoT security

Article | June 2, 2021

Modern computing devices can be thought of as a collection of discrete microprocessors each with a dedicated function like high-speed networking, graphics, Disk I/O, AI, and everything in between. The emergence of the intelligent edge has accelerated the number of these cloud-connected devices that contain multiple specialized sub-processors each with its own firmware layer and often a custom operating system. Many vulnerability analysis and endpoint detection and response (EDR) tools find it challenging to monitor and protect devices at the firmware level, leading to an attractive security gap for attackers to exploit. At the same time, we have also seen growth in the number of attacks against firmware where sensitive information like credentials and encryption keys are stored in memory. A recent survey commissioned by Microsoft of 1,000 security decision-makers found that 83 percent had experienced some level of firmware security incident, but only 29 percent are allocating resources to protect that critical layer. And according to March 2021 data from the National Vulnerability Database included in a presentation from the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Agency (CISA) at the 2021 RSA, difficult-to-patch firmware attacks are continuing to rise. Microsoft’s Azure Defender for IoT team (formerly CyberX) recently announced alongside the Department of Homeland Security a series of more than 25 critical severity vulnerabilities in IoT and OT devices

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IoT Security: Inherent Risks Require Robust Solutions

Article | June 2, 2021

IoT technologies offer many remarkable benefits. They can make complicated tasks, such as tracking a fleet of thousands of vehicles, monitoring and adjusting manufacturing processes or automating a smart home or office simpler, easier and more cost-effective than ever before. By inviting IoT devices into our homes, workplaces and public spaces, however, we also expose new attack surfaces. When we assign an IoT system to be responsible for a critical task or trust it to monitor sensitive information in our most private spaces, we want to ensure that the system can be trusted. For this reason, it is vital that security best practices are applied at all stages when developing an IoT solution.

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IoT developers to focus more on smart healthcare post-COVID-19

Article | June 2, 2021

Healthcare technologies will be a greater priority among IoT service providers once the disruptions caused by the COVID-19 die down, according to Forrester Research. Based on its latest figures, only 7% of the work that major IoT service providers deliver in APAC is on Smart Healthcare. The crisis has triggered a lot of ideas and solutions, however there was simply no time to look at a more strategic approach for both the technologies and the processes. This will be the focus of governments, health care providers, and others, once the acute crisis is behind us,” said Achim Granzen, principal analyst at Forrester, told FutureIoT. He added: “I expect this number to increase past Covid-19, as governments, healthcare providers, and others will seek to harden many of the ad-hoc systems and measures they have put into place during the crisis.”

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More Than Half of IoT Devices Vulnerable to Severe Attacks

Article | June 2, 2021

More than half of all internet of things (IoT) devices are vulnerable to medium- or high-severity attacks, meaning that enterprises are sitting on a “ticking IoT time bomb,” according to Palo Alto Networks Unit 42 research team. In new research released Tuesday, researchers said that several deep-rooted issues exist around connected devices, both used by general enterprises and in medical environments. At the most basic level researchers found that 98 percent of all IoT device traffic is unencrypted, exposing personal and confidential data on the network. Other issues, like the reliance on outdated legacy protocols and operating systems, are opening up organizations up to older attack techniques that IT teams may not have had to deal with in years. For instance, researchers outlined one attack they discovered of a connected mammogram machine, used in a hospital, by the Conficker worm (malware first discovered more than a decade ago).

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Valorem

Valorem Reply is a digital transformation firm focused on driving change with hyper-scale and agile delivery of unique digital business services, strategic business models and design-led user experiences. Through the expertise of our people and the power of Microsoft technologies, our innovative strategies and solutions securely and rapidly transform the way our clients do business.

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