THE INTERNET OF THINGS: THE FUTURE OF LISTENING

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The Internet of Things (IoT) conceptually refers to the dynamic networks that link physical objects with the virtual world via Internet connection, enabling “things” to sense, log, interpret and communicate information, as well as act autonomously or in cooperation with other devices, environments, and people. IoT connected objects’ computing power and connectivity may range from very limited to extensive, and types of sensors or data collection technology used will vary. The Internet currently connects anywhere from 10 billion to 16 billion objects;even so, more than 99 percent of the estimated 1.5 trillion things globally remain unconnected.By 2020, there may be anywhere from 26 billion to 50 billion globally connected objects.

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Pycom

Pycom enables people to invent THINGS that connects to the internet. Pycom continues to pioneer and innovate with small wireless multi-bearer micro controllers that support Internet of Things (IoT) deployments for a large community of developers, enterprises and education establishments where speed is key.

OTHER ARTICLES

Industry deep dives at IoT Exchange

Article | February 19, 2020

Your industry is unique. Chances are, it even has its own language. That’s why you want information geared toward your unique sector. At IBM, we have deep industry expertise that we’ve curated into specialized teams focused to cognitive technology in vertical spaces. This year, we’re proud to host Industry Day at IoT Exchange for the Automotive, Aerospace & Defense and Electronics industries. Industry Day at IoT Exchange 2020 features tailored activities across three industry workgroups. Clients who are under the IBM Feedback Program Agreement (FPA) can meet with IBM leaders to share best practices and experiences, and to help shape the future of IBM industry solutions. These user groups provide you the opportunity to influence the direction for emerging technology. Note: this is not a general admission program. So if you’d like to participate, you’ll want to complete the contact form. A member of our client programs team will contact you.

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AR Indoor Navigation Technology Connects Retailers With Shoppers

Article | February 19, 2020

Technology drives innovation, and for most retail companies, the “Transform or Die” motto still rings true. Retailers are always experimenting with the latest tech innovations to reshape the customer experience to alter their expectations both in physical stores and online. But simply following every hot trend in the industry because of the fear of missing out (FOMO) is one of the most common mistakes retailers make when adopting emerging technologies. The retailers who thrive in their respective markets are the ones who learn how to implement technologies that deliver the highest return on investment (ROI) from Gartner’s hype cycle for emerging technologies.

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Zigbee vs. Bluetooth: Choosing the Right Protocol for Your IoT Application

Article | February 19, 2020

Both Zigbee® and Bluetooth® wireless protocols are widely used for local communications in Internet of Things (IoT) applications, and there are some trade-offs to review in choosing the right one for your application. Each protocol has unique strengths that guide which solution to implement when designing a new network. In certain situations, one protocol will be a better fit than the other, though sometimes the right solution is to implement both together to take advantage of their combined strengths, as we will discuss in this article. To better understand these IoT protocol options, let's take a look at the advantages and limitations of Zigbee, followed by the same for three different "flavors" of Bluetooth: Classic, BLE, and BT Mesh. This will help explain the trade-offs and show some use cases for each, so that you can choose the optimal protocol for your IoT application - be it a smart city, industrial IoT, digital signage or other connected technology use case.

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Microsoft acquires ReFirm Labs to enhance IoT security

Article | February 19, 2020

Modern computing devices can be thought of as a collection of discrete microprocessors each with a dedicated function like high-speed networking, graphics, Disk I/O, AI, and everything in between. The emergence of the intelligent edge has accelerated the number of these cloud-connected devices that contain multiple specialized sub-processors each with its own firmware layer and often a custom operating system. Many vulnerability analysis and endpoint detection and response (EDR) tools find it challenging to monitor and protect devices at the firmware level, leading to an attractive security gap for attackers to exploit. At the same time, we have also seen growth in the number of attacks against firmware where sensitive information like credentials and encryption keys are stored in memory. A recent survey commissioned by Microsoft of 1,000 security decision-makers found that 83 percent had experienced some level of firmware security incident, but only 29 percent are allocating resources to protect that critical layer. And according to March 2021 data from the National Vulnerability Database included in a presentation from the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Agency (CISA) at the 2021 RSA, difficult-to-patch firmware attacks are continuing to rise. Microsoft’s Azure Defender for IoT team (formerly CyberX) recently announced alongside the Department of Homeland Security a series of more than 25 critical severity vulnerabilities in IoT and OT devices

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Spotlight

Pycom

Pycom enables people to invent THINGS that connects to the internet. Pycom continues to pioneer and innovate with small wireless multi-bearer micro controllers that support Internet of Things (IoT) deployments for a large community of developers, enterprises and education establishments where speed is key.

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