The Undeniable Business Case of the IoT

| May 28, 2016

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The business case for the Internet of Things and augmented reality in enterprise has never been stronger. Companies are leveraging these technologies to create entirely new products to increase connectivity across their organizations, and to better understand how their products are being used.

Spotlight

Argus Insights

Argus Insights is a privately-held company located in Los Gatos, Calif., and founded in 2009 based on Stanford PhD research by CEO John Feland. Feland started Argus to help other product designers deliver products that resonate with the market. “There’s no reason for to have bad products” John states Users are quick and prolific in providing feedback that can be used to better understand what users are currently expecting. Harnessing this feedback into the innovation cycle can eliminate the product misses we see today.

OTHER ARTICLES

Building a Cold Chain Management IoT Solution

Article | February 27, 2020

Artificial intelligence (AI) has existed in the public consciousness for decades. The (mostly) sentient machines playing the villains in Hollywood movies have never been realistic depictions of the technology, but they have left an impression, nonetheless. AI has proved as exciting to the layman as it is to the expert. Usually based in remote data centers, AI is capable of collecting and examining immense volumes of data, generating insights based on analytical algorithms. With varying degrees of autonomy, these capabilities have been put to use streamlining decision-making processes. While AI is often thought of as a product in its own right, it is increasingly intersecting with other parallel trends. Chief among these is the Internet of things (IoT), which enables previously isolated machines to “talk” to one another and, at the same time, generate data that makes new modes of operation a possibility.

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Nokia adds 5G to worldwide IoT network, lets carriers test new sensors

Article | February 27, 2020

Nokia may be best known for cellular phones, but in recent years the Finnish company has focused on networking hardware — the radios and infrastructure that connect cellular devices to the internet. Today, Nokia announced that it’s augmenting its Worldwide Internet of Things Network Grid (WING) with new 5G capabilities, enabling cellular carriers to offer global-scale 5G IoT services to customers without building out their own networks. While that’s a lot of jargon to absorb at once, the gist is that carriers like AT&T and Verizon want to offer business customers the ability to connect small IoT sensors to the internet but don’t necessarily want to spend the money to build the cellular infrastructure the sensors need to communicate. So Nokia offers WING as a global IoT infrastructure, partnering with carriers to sell access on a pay-as-you-go basis.

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The $6trn importance of security standards and regulation in the IoT era

Article | February 27, 2020

We live in an era of digital transformation where more and more devices are connecting to bring new and innovative levels of service and efficiency. This transformation spans across all markets and the rate of progress is breath-taking, says David Maidment, director, secure device ecosystem at Arm.This change brings huge benefits, but it also brings threats in the shape of an expanding cybercrime footprint. Every connected device is a hack potential. Rather than attacking traditional IT equipment, the cybercrime threats start to move to all aspects of our lives. It is predicted that by 2021 there will already be US$6 trillion (€5.37 trillion) of cybercrime damage (Source: Cybersecurity Ventures Official Annual Cybercrime Report), which is a staggering number pinned against financial loss for businesses, without considering the damage to reputation and other harder-to-measure statistics.

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Future ‘smart walls’ key to IoT

Article | February 27, 2020

IoT equipment designers shooting for efficiency should explore the potential for using buildings as antennas, researchers say. Environmental surfaces such as walls can be used to intercept and beam signals, which can increase reliability and data throughput for devices, according to MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL).Researchers at CSAIL have been working on a smart-surface repeating antenna array called RFocus. The antennas, which could be applied in sheets like wallpaper, are designed to be incorporated into office spaces and factories. Radios that broadcast signals could then become smaller and less power intensive.

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Spotlight

Argus Insights

Argus Insights is a privately-held company located in Los Gatos, Calif., and founded in 2009 based on Stanford PhD research by CEO John Feland. Feland started Argus to help other product designers deliver products that resonate with the market. “There’s no reason for to have bad products” John states Users are quick and prolific in providing feedback that can be used to better understand what users are currently expecting. Harnessing this feedback into the innovation cycle can eliminate the product misses we see today.

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