5G Is Poised to Revolutionize Industries Beyond Telecommunications

GUEST WRITER | December 6, 2018

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The pace of technological innovation has increased exponentially over the past century. It took the telephone 75 years to reach 50 million users. It took the Internet only four years to reach the same number. However, those metrics pale in comparison to the success of the smartphone game Pokemon Go, which was released in the summer of 2016. It reached 50 million users in only 19 days. With 5G networks on the horizon, user bases will continue to grow at breakneck pace. This next-generation network will accelerate innovation in a broad set of industry verticals—including media, entertainment, healthcare, and agriculture—and each will have its own requirements and uses. Every sector will fall into one of three categories: Enhanced Mobile Broadband (eMBB), Massive Internet of Things (MIoT), and Ultra-Reliable Low Latency Communication (uRLLC). These three standards will help usher in explosive developments in the industries that use them.

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An internationally recognized research, technology and business development consulting firm, Harbor Research has predicted, tracked and driven the development of the Internet of Things for the past 30 years.

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