Arm flexes flexibility with Pelion IoT announcement

JON GOLD | August 3, 2018

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The pervasiveness of Arm-based silicon – it’s everywhere from cars to signage to smartphones to supercomputers – makes the company a natural fit for an internet of things platform like the one it just announced. The Pelion IoT Platform's main selling point is its universality – the company boasts that it’s able to handle “any device, any data, any cloud” – in a marketplace overflowing with vertical-specific solutions. (GE and Siemens make industrial IoT products, other companies make platforms designed specifically to work well in healthcare, fleet management, or agricultural environments, and so on.) Pelion can sit on an edge device, in a data center, or even in an endpoint, integrating devices into a working ecosystem, although the focus is on the edge. Part of what makes Pelion possible is Arm's acquisition of Treasure Data, makers of an enterprise data management product designed to centralize data from any number of different silos under one roof. Arm said that Treasure Data's ability to synthesize a wide range of different types of data input into a coherent whole is a big part of the technology underlying Pelion.

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