Australia lets half of its Internet-of-Things profit slip away: Cisco

MICHAEL LEE | March 1, 2016

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Despite being capable of realising AU$74 billion in value from the use of the Internet of Things, Australian businesses are letting half of it slip away, according to Cisco. The Internet of Things (IoT) could create AU$14.4 trillion in value over the next 10 years, with AU$1.2 trillion of that available today, according to Cisco. However, Australians aren't making the most of the opportunities, and may still not tomorrow.

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Silver Spring Networks

Silver Spring Networks enables the Internet of Important Things™ by reliably and securely connecting things that matter. Cities, utilities, and companies on five continents use the company’s cost-effective, high-performance IoT network and data platform to operate more efficiently, get greener, and enable innovative services that can improve the lives of millions of people.

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Spotlight

Silver Spring Networks

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