Cognizant Named to “Winner’s Circle” for Internet of Things Service Providers

ANGELA GUESS | March 1, 2016

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A new article out of the company reports, “Cognizant today announced it has been placed in the ‘Winner’s Circle’ in the new HfS Research Blueprint Report: Internet of Things (IoT) Service Providers. HfS Research is a leading independent global analyst firm for the business and IT services industry. IoT involves the instrumenting and networking of physical devices in ways that generate large volumes of potentially meaningful business data. HfS defines IoT services as those that design, create, and manage a pathway for the physical world to enter the ‘As-a-Service Economy’ by creating a bridge between hard goods and services, and digital infrastructure. The HfS Blueprint: Internet of Things Service Providers report evaluated 18 major providers on a number of criteria to determine their ability to deliver services and drive transformation.”

Spotlight

Lantronix

For more than 25 years, Lantronix has been a leading global networking company. Today, our specialized networking expertise is being put to work to enable the more than 50 billion devices, machines and people being connected to, and participating in the industrial (commercial) Internet of Things (“IoT”). Device and (big) data management, mobility, and secure enterprise-level security and networking are key pillars in the reality of IoT. And addressing these fundamental pillars is exactly what we do. Our products, solutions, and services enable connectivity (wired, Wi-Fi and cellular) and the management of “things” – machines, devices, sensors, computers, and more. Any and every “thing” in the Internet of Things. Customer can embed our products in the things themselves, attach them to the things, or deploy them in data centers to manage the things.

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Spotlight

Lantronix

For more than 25 years, Lantronix has been a leading global networking company. Today, our specialized networking expertise is being put to work to enable the more than 50 billion devices, machines and people being connected to, and participating in the industrial (commercial) Internet of Things (“IoT”). Device and (big) data management, mobility, and secure enterprise-level security and networking are key pillars in the reality of IoT. And addressing these fundamental pillars is exactly what we do. Our products, solutions, and services enable connectivity (wired, Wi-Fi and cellular) and the management of “things” – machines, devices, sensors, computers, and more. Any and every “thing” in the Internet of Things. Customer can embed our products in the things themselves, attach them to the things, or deploy them in data centers to manage the things.

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