Common Networking Issues with IoT Devices and How to Avoid Them

GUEST WRITER | January 15, 2020

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People are finding new ways every day to enable IoT capabilities to once-manually operated devices, including door locks, solar panels, thermostats, refrigerators, dishwashers, soda machines, watches, fitness trackers, security cameras and more. There could be 50 IoT devices in your school or office, or 150. As digital transformation continues to impact every industry, facilities are proactively installing new IoT devices without realizing that its IT Department should have been notified prior to installation.

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Valorem Reply is a digital transformation firm focused on driving change with hyper-scale and agile delivery of unique digital business services, strategic business models and design-led user experiences. Through the expertise of our people and the power of Microsoft technologies, our innovative strategies and solutions securely and rapidly transform the way our clients do business.

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Automotive Cyber Security: A Crash Course on Protecting Cars Against Hackers

Article | March 26, 2020

Modern cars have dozens of computers on board, and they’re not just for running GPS or playing music. Computers monitor and control nearly every system on your vehicle, including steering, brakes, and the engine itself. This is why automotive cyber security is essential. If a vehicle’s computer systems aren’t properly protected, hackers can steal data or even take control of the vehicle. As you can imagine, that makes automotive cyber security a major concern for consumers, auto companies, and OEMs alike. But what is there to know about automotive cyber security? We’ll explore what cybersecurity in the automotive industry entails and what the biggest threats are to automotive IoT and connected vehicles. We’ll also share some insights from a recent webinar by Sectigo and Mentor Graphics on how to protect connected vehicles from emerging cybersecurity threats.

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Internet of Things (IoT): The Need for Vendors to Address Security

Article | March 26, 2020

By the end of this year there will be 5.8 billion Internet of Things (IoT) endpoints, according to Gartner. And depending on how IoT devices are counted the number is even higher. Statista, for example, estimates the device count for 2020 to be more than 30 billion. Security remains a big challenge for IoT as a strategy to be successful. IoT devices are still not being designed with security as a top priority.Mary O’Neill, VP of security at Nokia, noted in a press conference at MWC Los Angeles 2019 and reported by SDXCentral, that “if an IoT device today is plugged into the network and it doesn’t have protection on it, it’s infected in three minutes or less.”Jake Williams, founder of the security firm Rendition Infosec, said that “IoT vendors emphasize, often rightly, that their products improve quality of life, but they often neglect to disclose the risk of these devices to consumers. The onus of understanding how an IoT device might impact security should not be purely on the consumer. The vendor shares this responsibility.

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Scalable Software with Devops for Industrial IoT

Article | March 26, 2020

Scaling Industrial IoT (IIoT) solutions requires a DevOps organization that can manage increased software and hardware complexity in terms of capability, capacity and footprint. DevOps is derived from Development and Operations and is one of the buzz words for ICT companies. Often it is the amalgamation of Software Developers from R&D and senior engineers from Operations into a new organization. Startups are faced with the challenge of how to quickly create a functioning DevOps organization that can scale with rapid growth. In this article, we will deal with the keys for success to scale software solutions with using an example of an Industrial IoT solution. We will look at how DevOps should function and discuss the important principles for software development, tools and operations.

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How AI and IoT Provide Value in Construction

Article | March 26, 2020

Internet of Things (IoT) sensors predominantly provide visibility to an operating stack – enabling access to real-time and accurate operational data. Laying analysis on top of that data produces dashboards and other visual representations but artificial intelligence (AI) extends this further by harnessing the data streams to train models and identify patterns. Observations can then be made by a computer much like a human analyst could but at tremendous speed and scale. AI makes it possible to anticipate and predict events in a robust and scalable way. This can create huge business advantages. In this article, we’ll look at applications of AI and IoT in construction.

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Valorem

Valorem Reply is a digital transformation firm focused on driving change with hyper-scale and agile delivery of unique digital business services, strategic business models and design-led user experiences. Through the expertise of our people and the power of Microsoft technologies, our innovative strategies and solutions securely and rapidly transform the way our clients do business.

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