Dotdot Over Thread Deep Dive

LEVEREGE | February 20, 2020

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In the quickly evolving world of the IoT, multiple standards have developed in a short span of time, each with the goal of allowing smart home devices to communicate with each other and with multiple online services. One solution to this issue is the use of the Dotdot, an application layer developed for IoT devices to easily join networks of other similar devices and to communicate their status and capabilities in a standardized way, combined with Thread. Thread is an IP mesh network implementation designed for IoT device communication, promises to be a widely implemented standard in IoT device manufacture and development.

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