Ensuring Interoperability in Internet of Things (IoT)

RAGHURAMAN B |

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The Internet of Things is the next big disruption that will change the way information is shared, processed and consumed. It connects humans, internet and physical assets such as sensors and consumer devices into one connected ecosystem. The IoT market is at an inflection point and is poised to grow exponentially in the time to come. 99 % of ‘things’ in IoT are still unconnected, and this represents a huge opportunity for Communication Equipment Providers, Semiconductor and Embedded Systems vendors and Communication Service Providers. However, the presence of multiple communication technologies and the absence of universal standard means that Interoperability will be one of the most critical and most complex aspect of IoT. It is essential for the end user to have a seamless experience and interoperability will play a very vital role in implementing that.

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For almost 50 years we have been tackling some of the biggest problems that face our nation and our world. Our approach is holistic, looking at all the interconnected complexities of a problem. Our brand of science is collaborative, with knowledge shared across disciplines. And our focus is always on making the real world better. OUR MISSION Through our culture of innovation and history of performance, we develop deep customer trust built on integrity and create enduring solutions that improve our world. Leidos is a science and technology solutions leader working to address some of the world’s toughest challenges in the defense, intelligence, homeland security, civil, and healthcare markets. The Company’s 33,000 employees support vital missions for our government and commercial customers. Leidos is headquartered in Reston, Virginia, and annual revenues of approximately $10 billion 2016, including the recently completed combination of Leidos with Lockheed Martin's Information Systems &

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