Evolution of Data Management: The Role of Streaming Data and IoT Data Architecture

RONDA SWANEY | August 22, 2019

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Gartner has predicted that there will be 20.4 billion connected things in existence by 2020. Those things range from Internet of Things (IoT) sensors on manufacturing equipment, to smart electric meters attached to homes, to continuous glucose monitors worn by people with diabetes. As the sources and speed of data capture grow, data management must evolve to keep up. But as data management evolves, what role will streaming data and IoT data architecture play? With billions of IoT and streaming devices on the horizon, the growth of IoT appears to be unstoppable. Enterprises are building initiatives around these devices because they realize there’s value contained in the data they produce. But it’s not the data itself that is valuable. The only way to realize the true value of IoT and streaming data is to process and understand that data in real time.

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