Gear Up On IoT: Apple Jumps Into VR + Super Bowl No Fly Zones

LAUREN BARACK | March 1, 2016

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Apple’s tossed its hand into the VR wars, hiring computer science professor Doug Bowman from Virginia Tech. The Financial Times broke the news about Apple hiring Bowman — who was the director of the Center for Human-Computer Interaction at the university — late Thursday night.Japanese researchers have found a way to use radar to read heartbeats. While serious athletes still turn to chest straps to get the most accurate read on how their heart reacts to workouts— this new sensor-less technology picks up the waves of heart beats. But don’t hold out for a consumer app soon. The system is still in the experimental stage.Cisco’s investment arm is investing in Kii — a cloud software maker that is used by IoT developers. It’s Cisco’s second Japanese business investment.

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