How a secure IoT strategy can prevent a robot uprising

| April 14, 2016

article image
Even if you know that the first law of robotics says a robot may not injure a human, you still might have legitimate questions about a cloud security strategy to run all your company’s connected devices – robots included.

Spotlight

Marvell Semiconductor

At Marvell, innovation starts with great people. That’s why we’re looking for smart, diverse talent to help create the semiconductor solutions that make cloud computing, autonomous driving, and connected homes possible. Our customers rely on our ability to see -- and design -- what’s coming next. So if you’re interested in working on the frontiers of technology, check out our opportunities.

OTHER ARTICLES

AI + IoT = Automating and Analyzing Data Collection

Article | February 18, 2020

IoT is huge, but AI has the potential to supercharge the technology even more. Gartner predicts that this year 80 percent of all enterprise IoT projects will include AI. One area where many have been critical of IoT is a lack of good security. When coupled with AI, that could be improved, but some worry that AI can also be used as a tool to defeat IoT security. Dean Chester, cybersecurity author, wrote that “AI can be used for IoT security, or it can be used against it.”Melvin Greer, Chief Data Scientist, Intel Americas , said that “AI and IoT are no longer in separate swim lanes. AI closes the loop in an IoT environment where IoT devices gather or create data, and AI helps automate important choices and actions based on that data. Today, most organizations using IoT are only at the first ‘visibility’ phase where they can start to see what’s going on through IoT assets. But they’re moving toward the reliability, efficiency and production phases, which are more sophisticated and require stronger AI capabilities.

Read More

How Retail Security Can Welcome IoT Innovations Without Putting Customers at Risk

Article | February 18, 2020

Retail businesses, from mom-and-pop shops to major department stores, are investing heavily in technology to enhance the in-store experience. With the imminent arrival of mainstream 5G, smarter systems are expected to dominate the retail space as the internet of things (IoT) expands. But as we know from connected device deployments in other sectors, such as financial services and healthcare, the IoT is fraught with security vulnerabilities. For retail security, the risks of deploying IoT devices are no less dire. As organizations rely more on the IoT to enable internet connection at every stage of the retail process, protecting IoT infrastructure is critical. Getting on board with the right mindset can go a long way toward achieving a win-win for retail security.

Read More

Nokia adds 5G to worldwide IoT network, lets carriers test new sensors

Article | February 18, 2020

Nokia may be best known for cellular phones, but in recent years the Finnish company has focused on networking hardware — the radios and infrastructure that connect cellular devices to the internet. Today, Nokia announced that it’s augmenting its Worldwide Internet of Things Network Grid (WING) with new 5G capabilities, enabling cellular carriers to offer global-scale 5G IoT services to customers without building out their own networks. While that’s a lot of jargon to absorb at once, the gist is that carriers like AT&T and Verizon want to offer business customers the ability to connect small IoT sensors to the internet but don’t necessarily want to spend the money to build the cellular infrastructure the sensors need to communicate. So Nokia offers WING as a global IoT infrastructure, partnering with carriers to sell access on a pay-as-you-go basis.

Read More

The Rise of the AIoT

Article | February 18, 2020

Artificial intelligence (AI) has existed in the public consciousness for decades. The (mostly) sentient machines playing the villains in Hollywood movies have never been realistic depictions of the technology, but they have left an impression, nonetheless. AI has proved as exciting to the layman as it is to the expert. Usually based in remote data centers, AI is capable of collecting and examining immense volumes of data, generating insights based on analytical algorithms. With varying degrees of autonomy, these capabilities have been put to use streamlining decision-making processes. While AI is often thought of as a product in its own right, it is increasingly intersecting with other parallel trends. Chief among these is the Internet of things (IoT), which enables previously isolated machines to “talk” to one another and, at the same time, generate data that makes new modes of operation a possibility.

Read More

Spotlight

Marvell Semiconductor

At Marvell, innovation starts with great people. That’s why we’re looking for smart, diverse talent to help create the semiconductor solutions that make cloud computing, autonomous driving, and connected homes possible. Our customers rely on our ability to see -- and design -- what’s coming next. So if you’re interested in working on the frontiers of technology, check out our opportunities.

Events