How crooks can cover up crimes by hacking IoT cameras to show fake footage

DANNY PALMER | July 30, 2019

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Security vulnerabilities in Internet of Things surveillance cameras can allow hackers to remotely gain access to networks and manipulate live-streamed footage to hide evidence of crimes, researchers have warned. Security analysts at Forescout set up a laboratory using common IoT devices like IP cameras, IoT gateways, smart lights and motion sensors to analyse how attackers could gain access to networks and conduct illicit activity. Each of the devices were chosen due to being popular and commercially available, and no new vulnerabilities were exploited as part of the test, which employed a Raspberry Pi to carry out the attack.

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OTHER ARTICLES

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Article | March 11, 2020

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