IBM Creates Internet of Things Business Unit, Appoints Leader

ANGELA GUESS | March 1, 2016

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Andrew Nusca and Stacey Higginbotham reported for Fortune, “IBM has formally created an Internet of things business unit on Monday and appointed Harriet Green, the former CEO of Thomas Cook Group in the UK, to lead the new division. Green, 53, has been named vice president and general manager of the new IoT division and will soon oversee a unit that will eventually comprise more than 2,000 consultants, researchers, and developers that take advantage of IBM’s Watson, analytics, and cloud. In March, IBM CEO Ginni Rometty announced that IBM would invest $3 billion over the next four years in this new unit, working with partners and IBM’s cognitive technologies to help clients understand data in the emerging Internet of things space. Green will also head up IBM’s new education unit, which will formally launch later next year.”

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