Identity, Reputation, and AI Needed to Protect Healthcare IoT

DAVID FRAGALE | May 24, 2018

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Implementing a combination of device identity, reputation, and artificial intelligence can bring some much needed security to Healthcare IoT. With the healthcare IoT market set to quintuple in size by 2020, and the threat that is seen wherever IoT has been employed around the globe, nowhere does the concept of hacking into IoT devices seem more reprehensible than with healthcare. Before looking at how device identity, reputation, and AI can help, we must first consider why healthcare IoT devices can be so difficult to secure. Essentially, what makes them valuable – their small size and ubiquity – is also what makes them vulnerable. IoT has brought vital evolution to the delivery of healthcare, with wearable monitors, pumps, and other devices that enable providers to more closely track health metrics within a facility, and, perhaps more importantly, after the patient is sent home.

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Cymer, an ASML company, is a market-leading provider of sophisticated light sources used by chipmakers around the globe to pattern advanced semiconductor chips. ASML is the world’s leading provider of lithography scanners, which integrates Cymer’s light source technology to provide a complete solution for producing affordable microelectronics that enable today’s digital products and improve the quality of people’s lives.

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