IoT Basics: What is Predictive Maintenance?

JAKOB SCHREINER | April 14, 2019

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Predictive maintenance is one of the most tangible applications within Industry 4.0. It allows status data to be obtained from machines and proactive maintenance to be carried out on systems. This paper uses a definition and practical examples to explain how predictive maintenance works. By definition, predictive maintenance refers to a maintenance process that is based on the evaluation of process and machine data. It is used primarily in the context of Industry 4.0. The real-time processing of underlying data makes it possible to make forecasts that form the basis for needs-based maintenance and consequently the reduction of downtimes.

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OTHER ARTICLES

WiFi for Enterprise IoT: Why You Shouldn’t Use It

Article | April 9, 2020

So you’re building an IoT solution and you’re ready to select your connectivity approach. Should you use Bluetooth? WiFi? LoRa? Cellular? Satellite? As I’ve explored in a previous post, the connectivity approach you choose ultimately comes down to the specific needs of your use case. Some use cases favor mobility and bandwidth, and power consumption doesn’t matter as much. Other use cases favor extensive battery life and broad coverage, and bandwidth doesn’t matter as much. In this post, I argue that for Enterprise IoT solutions, you shouldn’t use WiFi regardless of the use case. To build and implement a successful IoT solution, your connectivity needs to be reliable and consistent. When there’s an issue that needs troubleshooting, knowing that certain components of your IoT solution are reliable and consistent enables you to narrow your focus and address issues more effectively. There are many challenges in IoT, many of which stem from operational challenges and from having thousands of devices out in the real world where they’re subject to harsh, ever-changing environments.

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Smart Building Initiatives are the Building Blocks of a Smart City

Article | April 9, 2020

To paraphrase a well-known saying, the journey to a complete smart city begins with a single building. No matter the size of the city, the extent of the technology or the most helpful use cases, a prospective smart city can integrate into — or branch off of — initiatives pushed forward by a smart building or campus. And when there is an increasing demand for these types of solutions, large corporations have the opportunity to improve corporate and social governance practices, as well as stand out in their community by championing more connected technologies.

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IoT Security Flaws Are Putting Your Business at Risk

Article | April 9, 2020

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How Will the Emergence of 5G Affect Federated Learning?

Article | April 9, 2020

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oT Now is the leading global magazine covering machine-to-machine communications (M2M), embedded devices, connected consumer devices, smart grids & metering, and the Internet of Things.

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