IoT Becomes IIoT and It Is Changing Everything

TAYLOR WELSH | November 30, 2018

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By now, everyone is familiar with the Internet of Things (IoT) where everything big enough to hold an integrated circuit or CPU has one on board somewhere. They’re in our refrigerators, stoves, thermostats, garage door openers, credit cards, smartphones, and probably not unexpectedly, in our running shoes, powered by our own motion, to accurately report how far we walked, calories burned, and distance travelled. Some might think this is excessive, but we have not yet begun to computerize all that we can. Currently we make computers that are so small, they almost vanish in a spoonful of salt or sugar.

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