Retail IoT: Walmart's IoT patent filing might be the creepiest ever

FREDRIC PAUL | October 10, 2018

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At this point, most people are aware that cameras may be watching them wherever they go in public — especially in retail establishments. But if a recent Walmart patent application becomes reality, watching your every move is far from the most intrusive way shoppers will be monitored. According to the patent, the idea is to put biometric sensors in shopping-cart handles. These sensors would track the shoppers’ heart rates, temperatures, grip strength, and stress levels, not to mention the cart’s weight, speed and idle time. Next, that info would be sent to a server where the data could be analyzed and compared against baselines obtained when the customer first grabbed the cart.

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SenseGrow Inc.

Founded in 2014, SenseGrow is a technology startup committed to providing the best possible Internet of Things technology to our customers. We create easy to use Internet of Things software that enables developers to build IoT solutions faster and businesses to get more value from their connected devices.

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Spotlight

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