Scalable Software with Devops for Industrial IoT

BARRY HAUGHIAN | April 6, 2020

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Scaling Industrial IoT (IIoT) solutions requires a DevOps organization that can manage increased software and hardware complexity in terms of capability, capacity and footprint. DevOps is derived from Development and Operations and is one of the buzz words for ICT companies. Often it is the amalgamation of Software Developers from R&D and senior engineers from Operations into a new organization. Startups are faced with the challenge of how to quickly create a functioning DevOps organization that can scale with rapid growth. In this article, we will deal with the keys for success to scale software solutions with using an example of an Industrial IoT solution. We will look at how DevOps should function and discuss the important principles for software development, tools and operations.

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Trinity Mobile Networks’ overlay software-defined networking platform, Jumpnet, makes cellular and Wi-Fi networks appear to end users as a single high-capacity, inexpensive, and ubiquitous network. Our platform and client-side libraries (Android and iOS) are designed from the ground up for smartphones and other moving, multi-interface, and battery constrained wireless devices. We enable channel bonding, seamless handoffs, mesh connections, multi-path transmissions, and provide an Always Best Connected service. Jumpnet allows devices, network architectures, and network rules to be reconfigured on the fly. Because all the network intelligence happens on the central server, a single device can be part of infinite different virtual networks with different rules. For example, VoIP and buffered data could have different rules and routes to maximize Quality of Experience. Jumpnet coordinates cellular, Wi-Fi, mesh, and wired connections for devices running our client-side software. Jumpnet he

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