The $6trn importance of security standards and regulation in the IoT era

ANASIA D'MELLO | March 16, 2020

article image
We live in an era of digital transformation where more and more devices are connecting to bring new and innovative levels of service and efficiency. This transformation spans across all markets and the rate of progress is breath-taking, says David Maidment, director, secure device ecosystem at Arm.This change brings huge benefits, but it also brings threats in the shape of an expanding cybercrime footprint. Every connected device is a hack potential. Rather than attacking traditional IT equipment, the cybercrime threats start to move to all aspects of our lives. It is predicted that by 2021 there will already be US$6 trillion (€5.37 trillion) of cybercrime damage (Source: Cybersecurity Ventures Official Annual Cybercrime Report), which is a staggering number pinned against financial loss for businesses, without considering the damage to reputation and other harder-to-measure statistics.

Spotlight

Cloud - Smart Living

About us? Nube is a company with a defined vision: to use the latest trends in IoT (Internet of Things) technology to build a smarter and better connected world, thus improving the quality of life in our communities.

OTHER ARTICLES

IoT Security Flaws Are Putting Your Business at Risk

Article | March 5, 2020

As industries invest in the next generation of technology, the internet of things is at the top of the list. Once a novelty best known in residential settings, IoT technology has become mainstream in business and industry. Some even predict that having a Google Home or Amazon Echo in the conference room will become the norm. Now, you will find connected devices in Amazon’s warehouse robotics system Kiva, Airbus’ Factory of the Future and the augmented reality used by Caterpillar in its Cat Connect system. The number of IoT devices in use by 2025 could reach 22 billion, according to an IoT Analytics report. They will transform manufacturing, warehouse and logistics, health care, agriculture, shipping, energy and aviation. IoT security can’t be done as an afterthought; it must be integrated into operations from Day One because connected devices and systems use cryptographic keys that transmit data. Cybercriminals can gain access through these keys, allowing them to infect devices and systems with malware, steal data or shut down systems. Sometimes, the vulnerability has gone undetected for months.

Read More

Microsoft acquires ReFirm Labs to enhance IoT security

Article | June 2, 2021

Modern computing devices can be thought of as a collection of discrete microprocessors each with a dedicated function like high-speed networking, graphics, Disk I/O, AI, and everything in between. The emergence of the intelligent edge has accelerated the number of these cloud-connected devices that contain multiple specialized sub-processors each with its own firmware layer and often a custom operating system. Many vulnerability analysis and endpoint detection and response (EDR) tools find it challenging to monitor and protect devices at the firmware level, leading to an attractive security gap for attackers to exploit. At the same time, we have also seen growth in the number of attacks against firmware where sensitive information like credentials and encryption keys are stored in memory. A recent survey commissioned by Microsoft of 1,000 security decision-makers found that 83 percent had experienced some level of firmware security incident, but only 29 percent are allocating resources to protect that critical layer. And according to March 2021 data from the National Vulnerability Database included in a presentation from the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Agency (CISA) at the 2021 RSA, difficult-to-patch firmware attacks are continuing to rise. Microsoft’s Azure Defender for IoT team (formerly CyberX) recently announced alongside the Department of Homeland Security a series of more than 25 critical severity vulnerabilities in IoT and OT devices

Read More

Who should lead the push for IoT security?

Article | February 10, 2020

The ease with which internet of things devices can be compromised, coupled with the potentially extreme consequences of breaches, have prompted action from legislatures and regulators, but what group is best to decide? Both the makers of IoT devices and governments are aware of the security issues, but so far they haven’t come up with standardized ways to address them. The challenge of this market is that it’s moving so fast that no regulation is going to be able to keep pace with the devices that are being connected,” said Forrester vice president and research director Merritt Maxim. “Regulations that are definitive are easy to enforce and helpful, but they’ll quickly become outdated.”The latest such effort by a governmental body is a proposed regulation in the U.K. that would impose three major mandates on IoT device manufacturers that would address key security concerns.

Read More

12 Industrial IoT Companies You Should Know

Article | February 10, 2020

As the industrial IoT market continues to expand at rapid rates, companies across the world are reaping the benefits. Utilizing this growing network of tools and systems, businesses have been able to prevent costly downtime, decrease product development costs, enhance customer engagement and satisfaction and acquire and implement intelligent data for strategic planning purposes.The potential benefits are seemingly endless, and the list of organizations that are embracing this industrial revolution is continuing to grow, so let’s highlight some of the main IIoT companies you need to know for a number of the most common IIoT use cases.

Read More

Spotlight

Cloud - Smart Living

About us? Nube is a company with a defined vision: to use the latest trends in IoT (Internet of Things) technology to build a smarter and better connected world, thus improving the quality of life in our communities.

Events