Top 5 things to know about IoT in medicine

TOM MERRIT | January 8, 2019

article image
IoT means a lot of different things, but one of its more interesting applications is in medicine; given its reputation for insecurity, that can be troubling. Let's look at five things you should know about IoT in medicine. SEE: Internet of Things policy (Tech Pro Research) It enables real-time monitoring. Your doctor can not only see your heart-rate, but also your glucose level, breathing rate, and much more. This can help them spot trends and get alerts to give care faster when needed. It enables real-time monitoring. This means your actual personal status can be monitored at any moment. However, if not properly secured with good access controls and strong privacy policies, you may be revealing a lot of information about yourself to people you don't want to. Your medical history is more detailed than ever. If you have wearables tracking your vitals—along with maybe a pacemaker, C-PAP, or glucose monitor—all that can create a clear picture of you in order to help a doctor better diagnose and treat you.

Spotlight

dDriven

dDriven is a pioneering Industrial Deep Tech company and the Strategic Digital Transformation partner of choice for several Fortune 500 Manufacturing Majors including ExxonMobil, Shell, Singapore Refining Company, Hanwha-Total Corporation, Rolls Royce (Singapore), LG CHEM, Essar Oil and Idemitsu Kosan just to name a few.

OTHER ARTICLES

5G in IoT Starts to Crystallize in Industrial IoT Market

Article | February 19, 2020

Much of the attention on 5G technology centers on a future of smarter phones, drones and self-driving cars. But 5G’s role in next-generation industrial IoT applications bears watching as well. While 5G may be one among many evolutionary steps, it is important in the development of new industrial IoT use cases. 5G connectivity, is the fifth generation of cellular technology. It is designed to increase network speed, reduce latency, and improve flexibility of wireless services. 5G technology has a theoretical peak speed of 20 Gbps, while the peak speed of 4G is only 1 Gbps. 5G improve the performance of business applications in various context, such as factories, self-driving cars and in handheld devices for field technicians.

Read More

IoT Security: Inherent Risks Require Robust Solutions

Article | February 19, 2020

IoT technologies offer many remarkable benefits. They can make complicated tasks, such as tracking a fleet of thousands of vehicles, monitoring and adjusting manufacturing processes or automating a smart home or office simpler, easier and more cost-effective than ever before. By inviting IoT devices into our homes, workplaces and public spaces, however, we also expose new attack surfaces. When we assign an IoT system to be responsible for a critical task or trust it to monitor sensitive information in our most private spaces, we want to ensure that the system can be trusted. For this reason, it is vital that security best practices are applied at all stages when developing an IoT solution.

Read More

Future ‘smart walls’ key to IoT

Article | February 19, 2020

IoT equipment designers shooting for efficiency should explore the potential for using buildings as antennas, researchers say. Environmental surfaces such as walls can be used to intercept and beam signals, which can increase reliability and data throughput for devices, according to MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL).Researchers at CSAIL have been working on a smart-surface repeating antenna array called RFocus. The antennas, which could be applied in sheets like wallpaper, are designed to be incorporated into office spaces and factories. Radios that broadcast signals could then become smaller and less power intensive.

Read More

IoT Adoption: Before and After COVID-19

Article | February 19, 2020

The survey data I’m referring to comes from a study conducted by the Eclipse Foundation about the adoption of commercial Internet of Things (IoT) technology. The aim of the study was to get a better understanding of the IoT industry landscape by identifying the requirements, priorities, and challenges faced by organizations deploying and using commercial IoT technologies. More than 350 respondents from multiple industries responded, with about a quarter of respondents coming from industrial production businesses. While this survey was not solely focused on the manufacturing and processing industries, its results reflect the general business community’s IoT adoption at the end of 2019. As such, it is a pre-COVID-19 snapshot of IoT adoption.

Read More

Spotlight

dDriven

dDriven is a pioneering Industrial Deep Tech company and the Strategic Digital Transformation partner of choice for several Fortune 500 Manufacturing Majors including ExxonMobil, Shell, Singapore Refining Company, Hanwha-Total Corporation, Rolls Royce (Singapore), LG CHEM, Essar Oil and Idemitsu Kosan just to name a few.

Events