Unpacking IoT, a series: The scalability challenge and what you can do about it

TIM SZIGETI | December 3, 2019

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The Internet of Things (IoT) presents a number of challenges for network engineers. In my previous post, I explained how Cisco is helping to address the biggest IoT challenge by far: security. In this post, we’ll cover the next challenge: scalability. As shown in the figure below, tens of billions of devices are coming online within the next few years, which presents tremendous IoT scalability concerns. How can organizations possibly scale security and network policies to address all of these devices? If we have to configure IoT devices the way we’ve configured network devices for the last couple decades, then we won’t be able to meet the scalability requirements that IoT is driving. The “traditional” way – manual, box-by-box configuration – is slow and prone to errors.

Spotlight

Opto 22

Opto 22 manufactures hardware and software products that link all kinds of electrical, mechanical, and electronic devices and machines to networks and computers. Opto 22 controllers, I/O (input and output modules), solid-state relays, and software are used for industrial automation, remote monitoring, data acquisition, and machine-to-machine (M2M) applications.

OTHER ARTICLES

Smart Home Technologies: Zigbee, Z-Wave, Thread, and Dotdot

Article | February 11, 2020

If you own smart home products like SmartThings or Nest, you may be familiar with some of the technologies behind them. Network protocols like Zigbee and Z-Wave dominate the industry, while Thread, a younger network standard, is gaining headway as a strong contender in the battle for market share. Although this may seem like your typical rivalry between industry leaders, the competitive landscape is more complicated than selecting one over another.

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DEPLOYING MACHINE LEARNING TO HANDLE INFLUX OF IOT DATA

Article | February 18, 2020

The Internet of Things is gradually penetrating every aspect of our lives. With the growth in numbers of internet-connected sensors built into cars, planes, trains, and buildings, we can say it is everywhere. Be it smart thermostats or smart coffee makers, IoT devices are marching ahead into mainstream adoption. But, these devices are far from perfect. Currently, there is a lot of manual input required to achieve optimal functionality — there is not a lot of intelligence built-in. You must set your alarm, tell your coffee maker when to start brewing, and manually set schedules for your thermostat, all independently and precisely.

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5 IoT Trends for Marketers to Watch in 2021

Article | January 29, 2021

The COVID-19 pandemic turned the tides towards remote work and virtual connectivity. And even though growth seemed to have slowed down in 2020, experts see double-digit growth in the next few years. The tides may be turning but virtual connectivity and the tools required for remote growth are not slowing down in demand. As the tech world adapts to new shifts, IoT is among one of the most anticipated technologies to prosper in 2021. Digital transformation has rapidly accelerated in the past year and if the experts are to be believed, 2021 shows promise for an even better year for technological advancement. According to IDC’s 2020-2024 forecast, spending will reach an annual growth rate of 11.3 percent. And with this, the number of connected devices is likely to grow up. Take a look at what will be the focus of IoT industry trends in 2021. Privacy & Security As smart homes are becoming the norm and you cannot throw a stone without hitting a smart device, one thing is clear—IoT devices are everywhere. People almost always forget smartphones when talking about IoT devices, but the fact is that smartphones are very much a part of the IoT ecosystem. And with the infusion of IoT in our everyday lives, questions about privacy and security are cropping up. Just recently, as WhatsApp announced its new privacy policy, millions of users planned to migrate to other alternatives. This led to WhatsApp pushing back its privacy update and tech businesses taking note of changing winds. In 2021, privacy and security will be at the forefront of IoT industry trends, as devices infuse further into the everyday lives of people. According to recent research, 90 percent of consumers lack confidence in IoT device security. And the onus of bolstering consumer confidence will be up to IoT businesses. Workforce Management According to Gartner’s “Top Strategic Technology Trends For 2021” report, IoT will be a large part of the office experience in 2021. As businesses are trying to avoid the losses that occurred in early 2020, workplaces are being geared up with RFID tags, sensors, and monitors to ensure social distancing measures, whether employees are wearing masks and overall health monitoring. Additionally, many organizations have decided to move permanently to a remote mode and will rely more on IoT devices for connectivity. So we can expect better automated scheduling and calendar tools, more interactive video conferencing, and virtual meeting technology. In the case of fieldwork, IoT will offer an added factor of monitoring behavior. Greener IoT Experts predict that energy will be a crucial factor in the IoT industry trends in 2021. With smart grids, metering, and restoration resilience being powered by IoT, 2021 will move towards optimized energy consumption and devices that are designed to encourage energy-friendly practices. What’s more? Smart engines and automobiles can be optimized to reduce their carbon footprint and become energy-friendly. As evidenced by the Paris summit and the wildfires in 2020, the world is becoming ecologically conscious. IoT devices in 2021 will focus heavily on reduced emissions, lowering air and ocean pollution, and minimizing power expenditure. Location Data As COVID-19 limited human interaction, location-based services soared during the pandemic. Businesses started leveraging location data to offer curbside pickup, virtual queues, and check-ins for reservations to enhance the customer experience during the pandemic. According to experts, the use of location data will continue to be crucial for customer service and convenience in 2021. As people prefer being safe even as the vaccines are being delivered, location data will allow businesses to cater to their customers without compromising on customer or employee safety. Digital twins IoT is being helmed as the perfect technology partner for creating digital twins in many industries. As IoT collects a large amount of data through physical devices, this data can be reinterpreted to create the perfect digital twins. Also, IoT can offer visibility into the full product life cycle and unfold deeper operational intelligence. Companies like Siemens are already leveraging technologies like AIoT to design and create digital twins for product design and production. Coupled with AI, IoT will be used more commonly for creating digital twins in 2021. A technology as dynamic as IoT can be leveraged for almost any application. Therefore, it may surprise us all in the way it progresses in 2021. However, experts believe that the above 5 IoT industry trends will rule 2021 for sure. Frequently Asked Questions What are the latest IoT industry trends? The use of IoT in Healthcare, Artificial Intelligence, workforce management, and ecological conservation can be deemed as some of the latest trends in IoT. What is the future scope of IoT? As experts believe there will be over 85 billion connected devices by the end of 2021, and the numbers are promising for upcoming years, we can safely say that the future of IoT is indeed bright. What industries are most likely to use the Internet of things technology? IoT is a dynamic technology with applications in almost every industry. However, industries like healthcare, construction, manufacturing, tech, and resource management are most like to use IoT right now. { "@context": "https://schema.org", "@type": "FAQPage", "mainEntity": [{ "@type": "Question", "name": "What are the latest IoT industry trends?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "The use of IoT in Healthcare, Artificial Intelligence, workforce management, and ecological conservation can be deemed as some of the latest trends in IoT." } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "What is the future scope of IoT?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "As experts believe there will be over 85 billion connected devices by the end of 2021, and the numbers are promising for upcoming years, we can safely say that the future of IoT is indeed bright." } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "What industries are most likely to use the Internet of things technology?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "IoT is a dynamic technology with applications in almost every industry. 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What Is CBRS and How Does It Help IoT?

Article | February 26, 2020

The Internet of Things continues to grow fueled by applications that solve problems for enterprise customers. One of the biggest barriers to IoT solutions in enterprise settings is reliable and low-cost wireless connectivity. Where Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, LoRa, Zigbee and others have tried to solve the problem before, CBRS (Citizens Broadband Radio Service) is posed to offer a viable alternative for enterprise IoT connectivity. Specific to the United States, Citizen’s Broadband Radio Service (CBRS) is a piece of the radio spectrum between 3550 – 3700 MHz. This is a valuable area of the spectrum because it allows good propagation (ability to penetrate walls and go medium distances) with the benefits of higher bandwidth services, such as LTE and 5G.

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Spotlight

Opto 22

Opto 22 manufactures hardware and software products that link all kinds of electrical, mechanical, and electronic devices and machines to networks and computers. Opto 22 controllers, I/O (input and output modules), solid-state relays, and software are used for industrial automation, remote monitoring, data acquisition, and machine-to-machine (M2M) applications.

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