Why interoperability is key for IoT

| March 1, 2016

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As the development of new Internet of Things (IoT) technologies surges ahead with dizzying speed, there’s an increasingly critical need to get them all to “play nice” with each other. Without commonly accepted standards, these technologies will ultimately fall far short of their promise to create a richly connected world. That’s true on the enterprise side of the equation, as we devise increasingly elegant IoT solutions on a grand scale for everything from smarter elevators to safer cities. And it’s also true at the corner hardware store, where many consumers are becoming acutely aware of a standards gap in the connected products available today, such as home automation devices.

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5 IoT Trends for Marketers to Watch in 2021

Article | January 29, 2021

The COVID-19 pandemic turned the tides towards remote work and virtual connectivity. And even though growth seemed to have slowed down in 2020, experts see double-digit growth in the next few years. The tides may be turning but virtual connectivity and the tools required for remote growth are not slowing down in demand. As the tech world adapts to new shifts, IoT is among one of the most anticipated technologies to prosper in 2021. Digital transformation has rapidly accelerated in the past year and if the experts are to be believed, 2021 shows promise for an even better year for technological advancement. According to IDC’s 2020-2024 forecast, spending will reach an annual growth rate of 11.3 percent. And with this, the number of connected devices is likely to grow up. Take a look at what will be the focus of IoT industry trends in 2021. Privacy & Security As smart homes are becoming the norm and you cannot throw a stone without hitting a smart device, one thing is clear—IoT devices are everywhere. People almost always forget smartphones when talking about IoT devices, but the fact is that smartphones are very much a part of the IoT ecosystem. And with the infusion of IoT in our everyday lives, questions about privacy and security are cropping up. Just recently, as WhatsApp announced its new privacy policy, millions of users planned to migrate to other alternatives. This led to WhatsApp pushing back its privacy update and tech businesses taking note of changing winds. In 2021, privacy and security will be at the forefront of IoT industry trends, as devices infuse further into the everyday lives of people. According to recent research, 90 percent of consumers lack confidence in IoT device security. And the onus of bolstering consumer confidence will be up to IoT businesses. Workforce Management According to Gartner’s “Top Strategic Technology Trends For 2021” report, IoT will be a large part of the office experience in 2021. As businesses are trying to avoid the losses that occurred in early 2020, workplaces are being geared up with RFID tags, sensors, and monitors to ensure social distancing measures, whether employees are wearing masks and overall health monitoring. Additionally, many organizations have decided to move permanently to a remote mode and will rely more on IoT devices for connectivity. So we can expect better automated scheduling and calendar tools, more interactive video conferencing, and virtual meeting technology. In the case of fieldwork, IoT will offer an added factor of monitoring behavior. Greener IoT Experts predict that energy will be a crucial factor in the IoT industry trends in 2021. With smart grids, metering, and restoration resilience being powered by IoT, 2021 will move towards optimized energy consumption and devices that are designed to encourage energy-friendly practices. What’s more? Smart engines and automobiles can be optimized to reduce their carbon footprint and become energy-friendly. As evidenced by the Paris summit and the wildfires in 2020, the world is becoming ecologically conscious. IoT devices in 2021 will focus heavily on reduced emissions, lowering air and ocean pollution, and minimizing power expenditure. Location Data As COVID-19 limited human interaction, location-based services soared during the pandemic. Businesses started leveraging location data to offer curbside pickup, virtual queues, and check-ins for reservations to enhance the customer experience during the pandemic. According to experts, the use of location data will continue to be crucial for customer service and convenience in 2021. As people prefer being safe even as the vaccines are being delivered, location data will allow businesses to cater to their customers without compromising on customer or employee safety. Digital twins IoT is being helmed as the perfect technology partner for creating digital twins in many industries. As IoT collects a large amount of data through physical devices, this data can be reinterpreted to create the perfect digital twins. Also, IoT can offer visibility into the full product life cycle and unfold deeper operational intelligence. Companies like Siemens are already leveraging technologies like AIoT to design and create digital twins for product design and production. Coupled with AI, IoT will be used more commonly for creating digital twins in 2021. A technology as dynamic as IoT can be leveraged for almost any application. Therefore, it may surprise us all in the way it progresses in 2021. However, experts believe that the above 5 IoT industry trends will rule 2021 for sure. Frequently Asked Questions What are the latest IoT industry trends? The use of IoT in Healthcare, Artificial Intelligence, workforce management, and ecological conservation can be deemed as some of the latest trends in IoT. What is the future scope of IoT? As experts believe there will be over 85 billion connected devices by the end of 2021, and the numbers are promising for upcoming years, we can safely say that the future of IoT is indeed bright. What industries are most likely to use the Internet of things technology? IoT is a dynamic technology with applications in almost every industry. However, industries like healthcare, construction, manufacturing, tech, and resource management are most like to use IoT right now. { "@context": "https://schema.org", "@type": "FAQPage", "mainEntity": [{ "@type": "Question", "name": "What are the latest IoT industry trends?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "The use of IoT in Healthcare, Artificial Intelligence, workforce management, and ecological conservation can be deemed as some of the latest trends in IoT." } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "What is the future scope of IoT?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "As experts believe there will be over 85 billion connected devices by the end of 2021, and the numbers are promising for upcoming years, we can safely say that the future of IoT is indeed bright." } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "What industries are most likely to use the Internet of things technology?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "IoT is a dynamic technology with applications in almost every industry. 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5 Things to Know About the IoT Platforms Market

Article | January 29, 2021

5 years ago, when we forecasted that the IoT platforms market would have a 5-year compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 35%, we wondered if our growth projection was unrealistically high. 5 years later, it has become apparent that the forecast was actually too low. The IoT Platforms market between 2015 and 2020 grew to be $800 million larger than we forecasted back in early 2016, resulting in a staggering 48% CAGR. Comparing what we “knew” back in 2016 to what we know today provides some clues as to why the market exceeded expectations so much. 5 years ago, no one really knew what an IoT platform was, let alone how big the market would be, which business models would work, how architectures would evolve, and which companies/industries would adopt them. The only thing that was “known” was that the IoT platforms market was a billion dollar “blue ocean” opportunity ready to be captured by innovative companies.

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How to Leverage IoT in Manufacturing to Usher in Industry 4.0

Article | January 29, 2021

IoT for manufacturing is disrupting the business process through analytical and cognitive capabilities. Connectivity of systems is allowing quality, operations, warranty and maintenance personnel obtain greater value from the manufacturing processes and assets. The industrial internet will further disrupt the manufacturing industry as Industry 4.0 and the Internet of Things will become more interdependent and data-driven throughout the whole product lifecycle. Industry 4.0 of course is one the major buzzwords these days as powerful AI based technologies are looking to transform the manufacturing process. But as in any industry, a lack of real understanding remains a key obstruction for digital transformation in manufacturing. Table of Contents: What is IoT in manufacturing? What is Smart Factory? What are the principles that propel us into a new way of thinking about the industry? How to adopt IoT in your manufacturing business? Conclusion What is IoT in manufacturing? IoT or let’s say connecting devices in manufacturing is nothing new. Yet recent trends such as the rise of the fourth industrial revolution, Industry 4.0, and the convergence of the digital and physical worlds including information technology (IT) and operations technology (OT) have made the transformation of the supply chain increasingly possible. Adoption of interconnected, open system of supply chain operations known as the digital supply network, couldlay the foundation for how companies compete in the future. For this to happen, manufacturers will be needed to unlock several capabilities: horizontal integration through the myriad operational systems that power the organization; vertical integration through connected manufacturing systems; and end-to-end, holistic integration through the entire value chain. This integration is known as Smart factory. What is Smart Factory? The smart factory is a switch to a fully connected and flexible system— one that can use a constant stream of data from connected operations and production systems to learn and adapt to new demands. A factory that can integrate data from system wide physical, operational, and human assets to drive manufacturing, maintenance, inventory tracking, and digitization of operations through the digital twin, and other types of activities across the entire manufacturing network. The result can be a more efficient and agile system, less production downtime, and a greater ability to predict and adjust to changes in the facility or broader network, possibly leading to better positioning in the competitive marketplace. READ MORE:Smart manufacturing: don't miss out on the industrial revolution What are the principles that propel us into a new way of thinking about the industry? There are four principles: • Transparent information — it is vital that a virtual copy of the physical world can be created, and this can only be done if data is freely available, from raw sensor data attached to machines all the way up to a higher-value, contextual information. • Interoperability of components — the Internet of Things (IoT) underpins Industry 4.0 and allows for the various machines, devices, and sensors to communicate effectively with one another. • Technical assistance — technology should not be invested in just for the sake of it, but rather because it provides clear assistance to humans, either in doing their job or making informed decisions. • Decentralized decisions — by making information more transparent and readily available, it should move the decision making process closer to the point of action, with only exceptional decisions escalated up the hierarchy. READ MORE: Transforming manufacturing with edge and IoT solutions How to adopt IoT in your manufacturing business? Here are 3 innovation plays along with suitable use cases that will help you clearly understand how to apply IoT in your manufacturing business: 1. Leverage data from a digital ecosystem As companies build IoT-enabled systems of intelligence, they’re creating ecosystems where partners work together seamlessly in a fluid and ever-changing digital supply chain. Participants gain access to a centralized view of real-time data they can use to fine-tune processes, and analytics to enable predictive decision-making. In addition, automation can help customers reduce sources of waste such as unnecessary resource use. PCL Construction is a group of independent construction companies that perform work in the United States, Canada, the Caribbean, and Australia. Recognizing that smart buildings are the future of construction, PCL is partnering with Microsoft to drive smart building innovation and focus implementation efforts. The company is using the full range of Azure solutions—Power BI, Azure IoT, advanced analytics, and AI—to develop smart building solutions for multiple use cases, including increasing construction efficiency and workplace safety, improving building efficiency by turning off power and heat in unused rooms, analyzing room utilization to create a more comfortable and productive work environment, and collecting usage information from multiple systems to optimize services at an enterprise level. PCL’s customers benefit with greater control, more efficient buildings, and lower energy consumption and costs. However, the path forward wasn’t easy. Cultural transformation was a necessary and a driving factor in PCL’s IoT journey. To drive product, P&L, and a change in approach to partnering, we had to first embrace this change as a leadership team. - Chris Palmer, Manager of Advanced Technology Services, PCL 2. Develop a managed-services business Essen, Germany-based Thyssenkrupp Elevator is one of the world’s leading providers of elevators, escalators, and other passenger transportation solutions. The company uses a wide range of Azure services to improve usage of its solutions and streamline maintenance at customers’ sites around the globe. With business partner Willow, ThyssenKrupp has used the Azure Digital Twin platform to create a virtual replica of its Innovation Test Tower, an 800-foot-tall test laboratory in Rottweill, Germany. The lab is also an active commercial building, with nearly 200,000 square feet of occupied space and IoT sensors that transmit data 24 hours a day. Willow and thyssenkrupp are using IoT to gain new insights into building operations and how space is used to refine products and services. In addition, ThyssenKrupp has developed MAX, a solution built on the Azure platform that uses IoT, AI, and machine learning to help service more than 120,000 elevators worldwide. Using MAX, building operators can reduce elevator downtime by half and cut the average length of service calls by up to four times, while improving user satisfaction. The company’s MULTI system uses IoT and AI to make better decisions about where elevators go, providing faster travel times or even scheduling elevator arrival to align with routine passenger arrivals. We constantly reconfigure the space to test different usage scenarios and see what works best for the people in the [Innovation Test Tower] building. We don’t have to install massive new physical assets for testing because we do it all through the digital replica—with keystrokes rather than sledgehammers. We have this flexibility thanks to Willow Twin and its Azure infrastructure. - Professor Michael Cesarz, CEO for MULTI, thyssenkrupp 3. Rethink products and services for the digital era Kohler, a leading manufacturer, is embedding IoT in its products to create smart kitchens and bathrooms, meeting consumer demand for personalization, convenience, and control. Built with the Microsoft Azure IoT platform, the platform responds to voice commands, hand motions, weather, and consumer preset options. And Kohler innovated fast, using Azure to demo, develop, test, and scale the new solutions. “From zero to demo in two months is incredible. We easily cut our development cycle in half by using Azure platform services while also significantly lowering our startup investment,” says FeiShen, associate director of IoT engineering at Kohler. The smart bathroom and kitchen products can start a user’s shower, adjust the water temperature to a predetermined level, turn on mirror lights to preferred brightness and color, and share the day’s weather and traffic. They also warn users if water floods their kitchen and bathroom. The smart fixtures provide Kohler with critical insights into how consumers are using their products, which they can use to develop new products and fine-tune existing features. Kohler is betting that consumer adoption of smart home technology will grow and is pivoting its business to meet new demand. “We’ve been making intelligent products for about 10 years, things like digital faucets and showers, but none have had IoT capability. We want to help people live more graciously, and digitally enabling our products is the next step in doing that,” said Jane Yun, Associate Marketing Manager in Smart Kitchens and Baths at Kohler. Conclusion As these examples show, the possibilities for IoT are boundless and success is different for every company. Some firms will leverage IoT only for internal processes, while others will use analytics and automation to empower all the partners in their digital ecosystems. Some companies will wrap data services around physical product offerings to optimize the customer experience and deepen relationships, while still others will rethink their products and services to tap emerging market demand and out-position competitors. Many would argue that the IoT adoption in the manufacturing industry has fallen short of the expected growth rate but given the benefits of connected devices, its wide adoption is only a matter of time. What might we be missing right now is the talent or the C-level willingness to bring about IoT transformation and steer us towards Industry 4.0. READ MORE:Why artificial intelligence will finally unlock IoT.

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Industry deep dives at IoT Exchange

Article | January 29, 2021

Your industry is unique. Chances are, it even has its own language. That’s why you want information geared toward your unique sector. At IBM, we have deep industry expertise that we’ve curated into specialized teams focused to cognitive technology in vertical spaces. This year, we’re proud to host Industry Day at IoT Exchange for the Automotive, Aerospace & Defense and Electronics industries. Industry Day at IoT Exchange 2020 features tailored activities across three industry workgroups. Clients who are under the IBM Feedback Program Agreement (FPA) can meet with IBM leaders to share best practices and experiences, and to help shape the future of IBM industry solutions. These user groups provide you the opportunity to influence the direction for emerging technology. Note: this is not a general admission program. So if you’d like to participate, you’ll want to complete the contact form. A member of our client programs team will contact you.

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ITC Infotech

ITC Infotech is a specialized global full service technology solutions provider, led by Business and Technology Consulting. ITC Infotech’s DigitaligenceAtWork infuses technology with domain, data, design, and differentiated delivery to significantly enhance experience and efficiency, enabling our clients to differentiate and disrupt their business.

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