Why Makerspaces Are Democratizing IoT Development

CRYSTAL BEDELL | August 10, 2019

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As makerspaces pop up across the United States, they’re democratizing the equipment and skillsets people need to transform their ideas into physical objects. Increasingly, those objects are connected to the Internet, making them a breeding ground for IoT development. We have existed for so long in a virtual world — the Internet, software, apps, cloud — that the remarkable thing about the IoT is that there are things involved,” said Kim Brand, president of 1st Makerspace. “What demarcates the web from the world is that the world has things, and it’s difficult to deploy a device without the electronic circuitry, the enclosure, power supply, cable harnessing — things that occupy real 3D volumes — spaces. In general, I think of a makerspace as an open space that’s part classroom that attracts people who are creative, and who are a little pragmatic, and allows them to put their hands on tools and equipment and bring their ideas to life,” said Jason Pennington, executive director at Indiana IoT Lab. “A makerspace makes machinery, tools and software that in some cases could be cost prohibitive available to members and small businesses.

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