Why Nest’s Revolv hubs won’t be the last IoT devices knocked offline

STEPHEN LAWSON | March 1, 2016

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The hubs they use to control devices around their homes through a smartphone app will stop working on May 15. It seems that Nest, the division of Alphabet that acquired Revolv in 2014, thinks it has a better way to do this. So the service connected to Revolv hubs will end and the devices, which sold for a list price of US$299, will be deactivated."As of May 15, 2016, Revolv service will no longer be available. The Revolv app won’t open and the hub won’t work," the company said on its site. All Revolv data will be deleted.

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Kobil

Kobil solutions set a benchmark in digital identity and high-secure data technology. Founded in 1986, the Kobil Group, headquartered in Worms, Germany and proud of its 120 employees, is pioneer in the fields of smart card, one-time password, authentication and cryptography. Core of the Kobil philosophy is to empower a complete identity and mobile security management on all platforms and communication channels. Nearly half of Kobil employees work in the development including leading specialists in cryptography. Kobil plays a crucial role in the development of new encryption standards.

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Spotlight

Kobil

Kobil solutions set a benchmark in digital identity and high-secure data technology. Founded in 1986, the Kobil Group, headquartered in Worms, Germany and proud of its 120 employees, is pioneer in the fields of smart card, one-time password, authentication and cryptography. Core of the Kobil philosophy is to empower a complete identity and mobile security management on all platforms and communication channels. Nearly half of Kobil employees work in the development including leading specialists in cryptography. Kobil plays a crucial role in the development of new encryption standards.

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