5G'S ROLE IN THE INTERNET OF THINGS

Intel

The Internet of Things is expected to be the main driver of demand for the higher information rates and lower latencies of 5G, and it will be a different world. The current LTE framework is built around the base station. It’s not clear yet how 5G, WiFi, Bluetooth, and other communications modalities will divide the IoT communications pie, or how they will interact in practice. Will high-bit-rate, short-range communications in ranges above 6GHz bypass the bases-station take on the local device-to-device load. Will backers of different protocols go to war over staking claims to the expanding spectrum? How will IoT networks coordinate among devices that may rely on different communications protocols? How much data will have to be referred through the backbone for central coordination, and how much will be allocated and adjudicated out on the edge.
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Spotlight

In the past years, communities of amateur enthusiasts have created more and more technical solutions for environmental monitoring, environmental control and data acquisition. A plethora of solutions already exists based on open hardware and software platforms (e.g., Arduino1 or Wiring2 ) as well as he recent advances in the mobile devices market. The members of such communities who systematically collect data to foster additional knowledge on a certain subject or region can be called citizen scientists [9]. They use open hardware systems and smartphones as the basis for building sensor platforms to observe and measure their environment. Data generated by such sensor platforms is often pushed to Sensor Web portals [4], such as cosm3 or Thingspeak4 , which offer functions for storing, sharing,  visualizing, as well as discovering sensor data. Those Sensor Web platforms, which expose sensors as Web-accessible resources, form a part of the Internet of Things.


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Defending IoT Threats in the Enterprise

Pwnie Express

In the rush to deploy and reap the benefits of IoT, enterprise security pros are now presented with a new challenge less secure or unpatchable devices touching the network with expanded wireless connections. While IoT systems benefit enterprises with new capabilities, the technology also presents financial, safety and other risks.
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Get Smarter about Cybersecurity and IoT

Mocana Corporation

In March 2016, reports emerged that hackers had infiltrated a water utility’s control system. Many critical IT and operational technology (OT) functions ran on the same system, which was connected to the internet, exposing the system to attacks. In this case, the hackers were able to change the levels of chemicals being used to treat tap water, threatening the health and safety of citizens.
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5G Connectivity & Security Critical for the Growth of IoT

Cradlepoint

5G isn’t just a trendy buzzword. For enterprises and organizations everywhere, 5G has vast potential to expand what’s possible especially for IoT. With IoT deployments popping up everywhere and 5G rollouts right around the corner, organizations can take advantage of new opportunities ranging from very high-density IoT to augmented reality and real-time video to provide new services and gain competitive advantages. Many use cases that already are thriving with 4G LTE are poised for even greater performance, reliability, and cost-efficiency once 5G arrives.
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Protecting IoT Devices & Networks From Cyber Crime

Cradlepoint

The potential of widely distributed IoT devices to enable new business opportunities, streamline operations, and reduce costs is vast, but so are the security implications. With IoT playing an increasingly big role at branch offices, within vehicles and in the wild, larger attack surfaces are giving IT teams more to worry about than ever before. Well-publicized attacks such as Mirai botnets and WannaCry grabbed headlines, but they're just the tip of the iceberg. IoT threats are becoming too prevalent and advanced to address with traditional security tools. Now is the time for software-defined, policy-based security solutions that isolate IoT devices and protect organizations' most valuable data - regardless of the WAN source.
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Spotlight

In the past years, communities of amateur enthusiasts have created more and more technical solutions for environmental monitoring, environmental control and data acquisition. A plethora of solutions already exists based on open hardware and software platforms (e.g., Arduino1 or Wiring2 ) as well as he recent advances in the mobile devices market. The members of such communities who systematically collect data to foster additional knowledge on a certain subject or region can be called citizen scientists [9]. They use open hardware systems and smartphones as the basis for building sensor platforms to observe and measure their environment. Data generated by such sensor platforms is often pushed to Sensor Web portals [4], such as cosm3 or Thingspeak4 , which offer functions for storing, sharing,  visualizing, as well as discovering sensor data. Those Sensor Web platforms, which expose sensors as Web-accessible resources, form a part of the Internet of Things.

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