Making Apps for the Internet of Things

Fierce Markets

The impending explosion in the Internet of Things (IoT)—where billions of devices and objects will be connected to the Internet—will likely present a big opportunity for app developers.But making apps for IoT isn't a straightforward process—at least not yet. IoT devices will likely be very different from smartphones or even smartwatches because they will have low power requirements, no screen and perhaps low processing power. In addition, there is no common platform for developers to use to build IoT apps.
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Spotlight

It all began with a coffeepot. A coffeepot that was connected to the Internet (before it was even called the Internet) and which provided information about its status (long before there was Twitter). In 1991, researchers at Cambridge University shared a single coffeepot among several floors. The researchers were frustrated by the fact that they would often climb several flights of stairs, only to find the coffeepot empty. They set up a video camera that broadcast a still image to their desktops about three times per minute — enough to determine the level of coffee in the glass pot.1 Several years later, that coffeepot had become one of the first Internet web cam sensations, with millions of hits worldwide. That coffeepot was a proof of concept for today’s networked objects and the Internet of Things.2 Since then, the price of processing power has dropped significantly, and a number of projects are demonstrating the benefits of adding processors, sensors, and transmitters to a range of objects.


OTHER ON-DEMAND WEBINARS

IoT, Blockchain and Healthcare: Are we Ready?

Humanized Internet

With the Internet of Things and applications such as wearable personal health trackers, we are becoming more the center of our active care management. The issues of privacy and security are foundational to the safety of our healthcare data. What is the possible function of blockchain, in our healthcare industry given the numerous players such as insurance, physicians, pharmaceuticals, researchers and above all the patient where transactions such as medical care records; drug trial results may be transacted immutably on a public ledger or perhaps a ledger that is hybrid, public-private? The speaker will articulate blockchain use cases that may be considered for application in the healthcare industry. There is work in progress in this space of healthcare and blockchain, however, what must be pivotal in the discussion is that the patient remain the center of this dynamically changing universe. Education will be critical and an opportunity for this industry!
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SAP HANA Cloud Platform + Zebra Zatar IoT Cloud Service

Zebra Zatar

Zebra Technologies manufactures and sells industrial mobile and wearable computers (Motorola Enterprise), bar code and RFID scanners, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth real-time locationing solutions, thermal barcode label and receipt printers, RFID smart label printers/encoders, and card and kiosk printers. Zatar is the Internet of Things application enablement platform from Zebra Technologies that allows your business to harness the power of IoT. With Zatar you can easily connect all types of devices, equipment and sensors to the Internet and take advantage of the data and information they generate to grow your business, increase efficiency and drive productivity.
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Electronic Logging Devices: IoT Connectivity enables conversion and compliance

Aeris

The goal of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) Electronic Logging Device (ELD) mandate is to streamline the logging process for commercial motor vehicle drivers. ELD technology improves the quality and organization of a driver’s Record of Duty Status data and ensures compliance with Hours of Service requirements. For customers switching from the old standard (FMCSA 395.15), the final deadline for conversion to compliant standard (§ 395.20) is December 16, 2019.
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Selecting the right sensing solutions for IoT and smart city applications

Avnet

The emergence of the Internet of Things has changed the way engineers approach environmental control systems. It is now easier than ever to control the direct and indirect environmental factors to which housing, urban areas, or industrial plants are subject, through cloud-based solutions, thresholds and automatic response procedures. Sensors play a key role in these systems, gathering the data from which intelligent decisions can be made by a central control system.
Watch Now

Spotlight

It all began with a coffeepot. A coffeepot that was connected to the Internet (before it was even called the Internet) and which provided information about its status (long before there was Twitter). In 1991, researchers at Cambridge University shared a single coffeepot among several floors. The researchers were frustrated by the fact that they would often climb several flights of stairs, only to find the coffeepot empty. They set up a video camera that broadcast a still image to their desktops about three times per minute — enough to determine the level of coffee in the glass pot.1 Several years later, that coffeepot had become one of the first Internet web cam sensations, with millions of hits worldwide. That coffeepot was a proof of concept for today’s networked objects and the Internet of Things.2 Since then, the price of processing power has dropped significantly, and a number of projects are demonstrating the benefits of adding processors, sensors, and transmitters to a range of objects.

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