Vodafone's IoT Connected Heat Detection Camera May Help Safely Reopen Businesses after COVID-19

  • Vodafone’s latest solution, the Heat Detection Camera, could go some way to easing the tension.

  • A Heat Detection Camera uses IoT connectivity to provide alerts when a person’s temperature is suspiciously high.

  • Vodafone’s partner Digital Barriers, the cameras can deliver real-time body temperature readings within 0.3 degrees Celsius and require very little in the way of set up or software.


After so many months in lockdown, with no clear idea of when it will end, the idea of returning to work in an office is becoming increasingly alien. But whether you are enjoying your time working from home or are dying to see your colleagues again, one thing is certain: the transition from remote working to office working will be a tentative one.

Vodafone’s latest solution, the Heat Detection Camera, could go some way to easing the tension. Connected to the IoT, the thermal camera can screen entrants to the office building, at a rate of 100 people per minute, displaying a “discreet alert” in cases where the person’s temperature is dangerously high, potentially indicating infection.

However, Vodafone is quick to point out that this temperature reading is far from a diagnosis in itself and further investigative measures, following medical guidelines, would be necessary before any course of action is taken.

Read More: Pluribus Networks Announces Availability of IoT Video Security Fabric

Created by Vodafone’s partner Digital Barriers, the cameras can deliver real-time body temperature readings within 0.3 degrees Celsius and require very little in the way of set up or software.

 

Our IoT network can connect many cameras quickly and without disruption in almost any location; and our ongoing partnership with Digital Barriers provides reassurance that the underlying software and hardware is engineered to the highest standards,

Vodafone’s CTO Scott Petty.



As always when cameras are involved, there is a discussion to be had around privacy – ultimately, this is a form of intrusive surveillance after all, with the UK already being one of the surveillance capitals of the world.

But beyond the ethical considerations, this development represents an interesting example of how technology will be at the heart of the return to normality, just as it was at the core of the shift to remote working some months ago.

Especially with 5G coverage growing steadily in the UK, the slow and steady return to work could be a perfect platform for an explosion of IoT office solutions, health-related or otherwise.

Read More: NXP Semiconductors Expands Collaboration with Microsoft for IoT Real-Time Operation System

About Vodafone

Over 30 years ago, we made the first ever mobile phone call and sent the first SMS in Britain and have been changing the lives of billions of people ever since. We are taking 4G to the Moon and using big data for social good to intelligent transport systems and emergency drones, we are still shaking things up. www.vodafone.com

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